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Dawid begins first treatment thanks to donations

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By Michelle Crean

It was an emotional moment for one family as their son with complex needs began his very first treatment this week.

And it wouldn't have been possible without the help of school friends and the wider community who have helped with the huge cost.

Last week five-year-old Dawid Ciemny's parents Slawek Ciemny and Kamila Smietanska accepted a generous cheque of over €3,000 from his school pals and staff at Holy Cross Mercy School, where he attends the ASD Sunshine Class, after a number of fundraisers were organised.

Dawid suffers from a condition called Autoimmune Encephalitis which causes the body’s immune system to attack healthy brain cells. This week he began his first immunoglobulin infusion treatment in Poland with every session taking place six weeks apart and costing €5,000 each time.

Although originally given the diagnosis of Autism, his parents say it’s a lot more complex than that as Dawid is non-verbal and suffers from irrational anxieties and is in constant pain.

In November his parents, who live in Courtyard Killarney, set up a GoFundMe page 'The disease has taken control over Dawid !' and have so far raised €8,632 of a €50,000 goal.

With some of the funding raised online and that donated by the community through the school's fundraisers, it means that Dawid was able to begin his treatment.

Dawid's teacher Lucy O'Mahony said his father was deeply moved to receive a cheque for the sum of €3,375 from the staff and pupils of both the Holy Cross Mercy School and the Monastery School.

"He was enormously appreciative of the fact that such a large amount of money was raised for his son," Lucy told the Killarney Advertiser.

"Slawek found it difficult to adequately express the extent of his gratitude to the two schools involved. He was equally touched by the lovely cards from the children expressing their concern and well wishes for Dawid."

Dawid's mom Kamila said that they would like to thank everyone involved in fundraising.

"All teachers at the school did a huge job organising the fundraiser and we are thankful. Thanks for the massive support. We would like to thank the children and their parents for engagement to help Dawid. Thanks to people with huge hearts we can realise [the] next treatment plan."

The fundraiser is still open, she added.

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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