Connect with us

Property & Finance

Guidance for reopening your business

Published

on

By John Healy of Healy Insurances

It is heartening to see so many businesses reopen in recent weeks. I hope that the progress can continue so that we see the remaining hospitality businesses back in action shortly.

While there is a raft of information from Government and HSE sources, this week I will briefly outline some items to remember from an insurance perspective.

Contact your insurance advisor before you reopen: You may have reduced cover on your property or liability cover over the closure period and it is important to update this prior to opening your doors. Remember you may have staff on site in advance of reopening so it is vital that your policy covers them.
Review your Health and Safety Statement. This should be a living document and be available to review as needs be. Your COVID-19 safety measures should be included and all employees should sign that they have read and understand the statement.

Obtain Return to Work forms: Before any of the team return to work they will need to complete a return to work form and partake in any necessary training. These documents can be found at www.hse.ie.

Outdoor seating: If you are planning outdoor seating on public owned areas you will need to obtain a permit from Kerry County Council and your insurance policy will need to issue a specific indemnity to the Council. The Council will also require a minimum limit of indemnity of €6.5 million, which is standard practice for all State bodies. If this is your first time undertaking outdoor hospitality then you should include this in your Health and Safety Statement and do a full risk assessment.

Water systems: Put in place control measures to avoid the potential for legionnaire’s disease before your premises reopens.

Inspect plant and equipment: This includes lifts, ventilation and kitchen duct systems and generators. Ensure that your inspection certificates are up to date for any lifting plant including passenger and goods lifts.
Identify and display appropriate warning and safety signage for your premises.

Cleaning: Arrange the appropriate cleaning of your buildings and contents. External cleaning contractors should provide you with a method statement, proof of insurance and when finished written confirmation that the cleaning has been completed to the agreed standard.

The above is not exhaustive but there is a wealth of information available on www.hse.ie and www.hsa.ie for reopening. Finally, the very best of luck to all the hospitality businesses getting back to what they do best. All we need now is that heatwave!

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

What is an Engineering Statutory Inspection?

By John Healy of Healy Insurances Equipment owners and managers can typically have a diverse, complex and large number of plant and equipment types under their direct control and or supervision. With this comes the legal responsibility to ensure it is safe and that the necessary Health and Safety requirements are being satisfied. An Engineering […]

Published

on

0212024_shutterstock1660979749.jpg

By John Healy of Healy Insurances

Equipment owners and managers can typically have a diverse, complex and large number of plant and equipment types under their direct control and or supervision.

With this comes the legal responsibility to ensure it is safe and that the necessary Health and Safety requirements are being satisfied.

An Engineering policy will ensure that you satisfy the requirements of the Health, Safety & Welfare at Work legislation. Here is a brief outline of some of the most common plant and machinery that falls under this legislation.

* Forklifts and teleporters should be inspected and certified every 12 months
* Vehicle lifting tables should be inspected and certified every 12 months.
* Lifting plant such as hoists and goods/passenger lifts have an examination frequency of six months. Other machinery which are not lifting machines but have a lifting function, for example manual pallet trucks, excavators etc also require inspection under the health and safety acts.
* Steam boilers, steam receivers and air receivers should be inspected and certified every 26 months. Hot water boilers and café boilers should be examined every 12 months.

As you can see there are many sectors that are impacted by this legislation from construction and manufacturing to the hospitality industry, agri sector and motor industry. It should be emphasised that if there is an accident involving an item of plant an up to date certificate will be requested by both the Health and Safety Authority (HSA) and the liability insurers. It is also vital to say that routine servicing of plant and machinery does not replace the legal requirement to hold up to date certification.

There are a wider range of insurers and inspectors who offer this service. It is crucial to get the best possible professional advice as policy wordings and covers can differ greatly.

Continue Reading

News

What to look out for when viewing second hand homes

By Ted Healy of DNG TED HEALY After spending so long saving for a mortgage and filling in countless application forms, you are now ready to begin your house hunting in earnest. Set yourself a budget and have a look to see what is available in your desired locations within that budget. Viewing appointments can […]

Published

on

0211983_shutterstock494185750.jpg

By Ted Healy of DNG TED HEALY

After spending so long saving for a mortgage and filling in countless application forms, you are now ready to begin your house hunting in earnest.

Set yourself a budget and have a look to see what is available in your desired locations within that budget.
Viewing appointments can be arranged via a telephone call or a simple email to the selling agent. When making the appointment make it clear that the mortgage is in place and you are ‘ready to go’.

This week we will deal with viewing second hand homes and what to look out for on that first property viewing.

When you arrive at a house, you’ll get a general feel outside of how well it’s been maintained. Arrive early and study the exterior of the property before going in, and have a glance at neighbouring properties. This will help you to get your bearings before continuing with the viewing.

If viewing an older house, a musty smell is the first red flag for signs of damp. Also be wary of the smell of fresh paint; was this done to simply freshen the property up or what is it covering up? Is paintwork bubbling or flaking?

Take note of any wall cracking; hairline cracks in walls and ceilings are generally fine, but if you can spot a crack from the other side of the room, then it’s probably big enough to be concerned about.

In older houses, take a good look at windows and roofs. Window frames can slope downward if there are poor ground conditions underneath, and the roof of the house can sag in too.

Is there room to extend? If you are lucky enough that there is have a look for external manhole covers; it gives a good indication of the drainage and pipe layout which may complicate a future extension.

Don’t be afraid to ask the nosy questions; why is the house for sale? How long has it been on the market? How long have the current owners resided there? Has the house been rented out frequently? How many times has it changed hands in the last decade? Have there been any refurbishments? Has it been rewired/replumbed? Who are the neighbours? What is included in the selling price?

It is a good idea to take photos (with the agents consent) or videos as this will help you remember the property after you have returned home.

And finally, don’t be afraid to ask for more time. Spend as much time as you think you need to and don’t hesitate to request a second viewing.

Continue Reading

Trending