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Residents fear “someone will be killed”

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By Michelle Crean

Killarney town centre residents are pleading with motorists to slow down and to stop using their road as a shortcut as they fear someone will be killed or seriously injured.

On Friday last the junction from St Anne's Road onto O'Sullivan's Place was opened after works were carried out to change the road layout.

Once a two way road which was used as a shortcut by motorists when town traffic was extremely busy - there's now a new system in place - but residents say motorists continue to ignore the new signs.

For years they have fought for safer traffic management and thanks to Kerry County Council they have finally got it - but motorists are not complying - they say.

With a new 'No Entry' sign painted on the road and new signs up - they say motorists are continuing to use the road when in a hurry - describing it as a "highway".

"The new junction layout is not being adhered to," resident Louis O'Donoghue explained to the Killarney Advertiser.

"The new layout means that traffic can no longer enter off St Anne's Road which they have been using as a shortcut when traffic is busy. We have fought for something like this to be done for years in order to protect the residents both young and old from the cars that travel at speed outside our front doors. Unfortunately, the new layout and no entry signs are not being adhered to and traffic is still using the street like a highway breaking the rules of the road by breaking a no entry sign," he said.

"This constantly happens when traffic is backed up on St Anne's Road. Residents are highly frustrated with this and fear that someone will be seriously injured or worse by these cars."

Anne Mulligan added that "it's an accident waiting to happen".

Kieran Fogarty said cars are also in a hurry when driving through their road.

"Part of the problem is that many of the cars are in a rush for some reason or other."

Anne O'Shea told the Killarney Advertiser that they're thankful to the Council for the work but further work needs to be done.

"For 40 years we have been waiting. We're thankful to the Council but we've only got so far there's still some tweeking to do."

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Tributes paid to poet who leaves a rich legacy behind

Tributes have been pouring in for poet and writer Brendan Kennelly following his death (yesterday) Sunday. President Michael D. Higgins, Minister for Education and Kerry TD Norma Foley, and the Cathaoirleach of Kerry County Council, Cllr Jimmy Moloney, have extended their condolences. Kennelly, one of the country’s most popular poets, was a Professor of Modern […]

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Tributes have been pouring in for poet and writer Brendan Kennelly following his death (yesterday) Sunday.

President Michael D. Higgins, Minister for Education and Kerry TD Norma Foley, and the Cathaoirleach of Kerry County Council, Cllr Jimmy Moloney, have extended their condolences.

Kennelly, one of the country’s most popular poets, was a Professor of Modern Literature at Trinity College, Dublin until 2005. He passed away in Áras Mhuire Nursing Home, Listowel, at the age of 85.

“As one of those who had the great fortune of enjoying the gift of friendship with Brendan Kennelly for many years, it is with great sadness that I have heard of his passing,” President Michael D. Higgins said.

“As a poet, Brendan Kennelly had forged a special place in the affections of the Irish people. He brought so much resonance, insight, and the revelation of the joy of intimacy to the performance of his poems and to gatherings in so many parts of Ireland. He did so with a special charm, wit, energy and passion.”

With more than 30 collections, he leaves a major body of work, a legacy of teaching as Professor of Modern Literature at Trinity College Dublin, and the gratitude of so many younger poets whom he encouraged with honest and helpful critical advice, he added.

“Sabina and I offer our condolences to his sister Nancy, his brothers, Sean, John, Alan and Paddy, his granddaughters and the extended family as well as his wide circle of friends, all of whom treasured his presence among them, a friendship he valued.”

A PROUD KERRYMAN

Minister for Education and Kerry TD Norma Foley said she was saddened to hear of his passing.

“A proud Kerryman and giant of the world of literature. A wordsmith beyond compare blessed with a noble heart and infinite well of creativity. Many, many happy hours in times gone by spent with my students studying his wonderful poems. Remembering him with both gratitude and admiration. Rest in peace, Brendan.”

Mayor of Kerry, Cllr Jimmy Moloney, said “Brendan Kennelly was a remarkable poet and writer who produced some of the most important and iconic poems which now form part of his rich legacy”.

“He made poetry popular and accessible, which won him such admiration nationally and internationally. Brendan was first and foremost a Ballylongford man and despite many years in Dublin, he always maintained a close link with, and a love of, his native place. Several years ago, Kerry County Council had the honour of hosting a Civic Reception for Brendan in his homeplace. I know that was one of his proudest days, surrounded by his family and neighbours.”

The Chief Executive of Kerry County Council, Moira Murrell, said that Brendan Kennelly was an exceptional ambassador for Kerry.

“Brendan Kennelly was an exceptionally generous and kind man who always had great time for the people of his native county. He has made an enormous and enduring impact on Irish poetry, literature and culture, which is his wonderful legacy.”
 

FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS

Friends of Brendan and members of the public are invited to pay their respects at the Church of St Michael the Archangel, Ballylongford, from 3.30pm to 5.30pm tomorrow (Tuesday).
 
Funeral Mass will be held at 12 noon in the Church of St Michael the Archangel, Ballylongford, on Wednesday followed by burial in Lislaughtin Cemetery, Ballylongford.

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What to look out for when viewing second hand homes

By Ted Healy of DNG TED HEALY After spending so long saving for a mortgage and filling in countless application forms, you are now ready to begin your house hunting in earnest. Set yourself a budget and have a look to see what is available in your desired locations within that budget. Viewing appointments can […]

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By Ted Healy of DNG TED HEALY

After spending so long saving for a mortgage and filling in countless application forms, you are now ready to begin your house hunting in earnest.

Set yourself a budget and have a look to see what is available in your desired locations within that budget.
Viewing appointments can be arranged via a telephone call or a simple email to the selling agent. When making the appointment make it clear that the mortgage is in place and you are ‘ready to go’.

This week we will deal with viewing second hand homes and what to look out for on that first property viewing.

When you arrive at a house, you’ll get a general feel outside of how well it’s been maintained. Arrive early and study the exterior of the property before going in, and have a glance at neighbouring properties. This will help you to get your bearings before continuing with the viewing.

If viewing an older house, a musty smell is the first red flag for signs of damp. Also be wary of the smell of fresh paint; was this done to simply freshen the property up or what is it covering up? Is paintwork bubbling or flaking?

Take note of any wall cracking; hairline cracks in walls and ceilings are generally fine, but if you can spot a crack from the other side of the room, then it’s probably big enough to be concerned about.

In older houses, take a good look at windows and roofs. Window frames can slope downward if there are poor ground conditions underneath, and the roof of the house can sag in too.

Is there room to extend? If you are lucky enough that there is have a look for external manhole covers; it gives a good indication of the drainage and pipe layout which may complicate a future extension.

Don’t be afraid to ask the nosy questions; why is the house for sale? How long has it been on the market? How long have the current owners resided there? Has the house been rented out frequently? How many times has it changed hands in the last decade? Have there been any refurbishments? Has it been rewired/replumbed? Who are the neighbours? What is included in the selling price?

It is a good idea to take photos (with the agents consent) or videos as this will help you remember the property after you have returned home.

And finally, don’t be afraid to ask for more time. Spend as much time as you think you need to and don’t hesitate to request a second viewing.

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