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Real Kerry jersey to be sent to New York governor

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By Michelle Crean

New York's newest governor - who has proud Kerry roots - is to receive a brand new "official" Kerry jersey after being pictured this week with a "knock off" version.

FAKE: New York governor Kathy Hochul holding the fake Kerry jersey during a photo opportunity with Taoiseach Micheál Martin this week.

Killarney man Luke Quinn, who is manager of the Kerry GAA Store in the Outlet Centre, said that he will send an official county jersey to Kathy Hochul - after she was pictured with Taoiseach Micheál Martin holding a replica during a meeting on Monday.

During his visit Mr Martin met with Hochul - now one of America's most powerful female politicians - but it turns out that the jersey, which was most likely supplied by Ms Hochul herself for the photo opportunity, was fake!

"The store is going to send a Kerry jersey on behalf of Kerry County Board," Luke told the Killarney Advertiser.

"I heard about it [the fake jersey] on the day and it was all over Twitter. It generated a lot of interest. We sell them online at kerrygaastore.ie. In fact, we send a load of Kerry jerseys to America every day. She had no excuse for not having the official Kerry jersey."

He added that profits from the sales of fake jerseys make their way to other people's pockets.

"There are a lot of non-licensed jerseys. Every jersey we sell goes back to the GAA. The knock offs go into someone else's pockets."

Hochul was born Kathleen Courtney in Buffalo, New York, the second of the six children of John P. ‘Jack’ Courtney and Patricia Ann 'Pat' (Rochford) Courtney. Her grandparents, on her father’s side were from West Kerry, John Courtney, Fahamore, and Mary Browne, Cutteen. She took over as New York Governor on August 24 following the resignation of Governor Andrew Cuomo who resigned following a raft of sexual harassment allegations made against him by female employees of his administration.

On his trip Mr Martin visited the 9/11 memorial site where he stopped to read some of the names of the almost 3,000 victims of the 2001 World Trade Centre attacks. He also laid six white roses on the names of each of the Irish-born victims.

Taking to Twitter following the visit he said that he "enjoyed" meeting Ms Hochul.

"We shared our experiences in tackling the pandemic, and the importance of connectivity between our two countries. We also discussed her proud Kerry roots, and her family’s love for the GAA."

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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