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Davy is “hopelessly drawn” to proving people wrong

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The name Davy Fitzgerald is synonymous with great hurling and in later year’s successful management, “but to me, he was one of the greatest goalkeepers to ever play the game”.

So states Donal Óg Cusack, another outstanding goalkeeper from Cork. This quote comes from a new book ‘At All Costs’, which is ghosted by well-known sports journalist Vincent Hogan. He takes us through the ups and downs of a great player who won two All-Ireland hurling titles with his native Clare and in his retirement he went on to manage his native county to All-Ireland glory.

It wasn’t all plain sailing as he reveals his battles with ill health; he survived two heart attacks and also bouts of depression. He was also bullied in school and this bothered him, but the hurling saved him. He is a volatile and spirited character and this is very evident in his book which tells it warts and all.

“But it is fair to say that I was a coiled spring most of the time,” he readily admits. Little wonder, then, that he was embroiled in several controversies. He got into trouble with referees. “Again maybe I’d have been better advised to say nothing, but my head was stewing.” He defended his players when he was managing teams. “I had zero sympathy for the difficulty of the referee’s job. If I felt my team had been wronged I’d go to war almost in reflex.”

Proving people wrong

“There’s something in my psychological make-up that means I’m hopelessly drawn towards proving people wrong – it is how I am wired.”

Successful as he was in goal, sparks invariably flew. He saw no danger between the posts and he saved some miraculous shots. Who can ever forget his forays up field when a penalty was awarded to Clare? And it was often a very successful mission as his piledrivers made the opposition’s nets, raising those match-turning and match-winning green flags.

“I adore the trump of the underdog and I can’t think of anything better in sport or in life than somebody defying the odds. I see something of myself in the underdog. If anything I have too much belief in my own ability. It’s something that rubs people up the wrong way. I recognise that.”

He loves to see people “step outside their comfort zone and achieving”. That is exactly what he does in his life as a player and as a manager. “I have never been motivated by medals. The human story is what drives me on. Medals are the bonus.”

His bravery between the posts for club and county underlies the graphic account of his exploits including the Club Championship semi-final against Crusheen when a forward pulled high and the result for Davy was “looking down at my left hand and I could see part of my fourth finger hanging off. Instinctively I reached down to try to reconnect it”.

Forced out

What is very clear from the book is that as a manager he commanded fierce loyalty and he was a real players’ man, defending and supporting them through all their travails. He was often in controversy with the Clare County Board and even though he delivered an All-Ireland, that was not a recipe for calmness. The day came when he was forced out of the job as manager of Clare. The media gave him a tough time and so did the County Board.

What made it more difficult was that his father was secretary of the County Board. The charge of nepotism was on the lips of many and Ger Loughnane, his former playing partner with the Banner, was loud in his criticism of Davy, calling for his resignation as Clare boss.

Fr Harry Bohan was very appreciating of what Davy had done both as a player and as a manager with Clare but even that wasn’t enough to save him. Davy says he never took a cent from the Supporters Club. He got dogs’ abuse for using the short puck out game but he soldiered on as he believed it suited the Clare team that he had.

His training method was very demanding on his players and he tells of the bonding session which had them sliding down the Devil’s Ladder in Carrantuohill in the dark. Savage stuff. He had the dilemma with Podge Collins who declared that he wanted to play football and hurling with Clare and that did not sit easily with Davy. This was compounded when Colm Collins, Podge’s father, was appointed as manager of the Clare football team shortly after Clare winning the All-Ireland hurling title. More trouble.

Honorary Fellowship

One of the great occasions for Davy was when he was awarded an Honorary Fellowship from LIT for his successful work preparing the college team for the Fitzgibbon Cup.

Davy Fitzgerald bares his heart and soul to Vincent Hogan who presents this spirited soul to its readers. It is a great read, from his time as a player and later as a manager with Clare, Waterford and his present role as manager of Wexford.

Davy’s sentiments on the dust cover tell a lot.

“I’m a bad loser. That’s not something I can hide. Most competitive people are. Bad days can come close to poisoning you. There have been occasions when I’ve taken defeat too personally and, maybe, it’s left me looking petty and ungracious. I suppose I’m learning that all the time. But this game, this game of hurling puts life in us that I hope I never lose.”

The book is on sale now in Easons Killarney.

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The secret is in the book!

By Michelle Crean  The secret to finding your true happiness is all in a new book which will guide readers to unlock their potential. Brazilian native Michelle Hadad, who moved to Ireland 14 years ago has written ‘The Secret Box: Concave and Convex’, a 432 page book which addresses the issues of suicide and develops into […]

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By Michelle Crean
 

The secret to finding your true happiness is all in a new book which will guide readers to unlock their potential.

Brazilian native Michelle Hadad, who moved to Ireland 14 years ago has written ‘The Secret Box: Concave and Convex’, a 432 page book which addresses the issues of suicide and develops into two different narratives.

It is also a follow up to her previous work ‘The Secret Box…Finding the Key’, a 192 page paperback launched by Michael Healy-Rae TD and reviewed by now retired judge James O’Connor, in October 2017.

Michelle, who studied adult psychology and is a NLP practitioner who encourages clients to transform limiting self-beliefs, explains that this version continues the story of Maria from the first book.

In the first book, the reader compares and contrasts their own life experiences with those of Maria and ask themselves the very question posed at the end of the book in the final chapter or ‘Padlock 13’ – “who are you?”

“Readers are outside the box, they see their own stories – that’s when we judge others,” Michelle told the Killarney Advertiser.

“It is fiction and the story is in two versions, the positive is bigger than the negative. There is always hope regardless of pain.”

She added that people need to forget about what others think, and focus on their own values and traditions.

“It’s a self help book, it doesn’t matter what people think of us, life’s too short. I’m motivating people in a positive way because of my NLP and psychology qualification.”

However, she emphasised that readers don’t have to have read the first book to understand the second one.

“Maria is the leading figure and there’s a few characters from book one but you don’t have to read that to get book two.”

She added that she’s thankful to everyone who helped her along the way.

“I have been blessed to have met so many people to help with my books.”

Both books are available from O’Connor’s Centra, The Reeks and Horans Health Store on Beech Road.

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Green light for teen accommodation

By Michelle Crean  Plans for sheltered accommodation to house homeless teenagers in foster care have been given the go ahead. An Bord Pleanala has approved a three-storey building in Flemings Lane just off High Street, which will have eight bedrooms, two one bedroom apartments and one two bedroom apartment. The teens living within the premises […]

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By Michelle Crean
 

Plans for sheltered accommodation to house homeless teenagers in foster care have been given the go ahead.

An Bord Pleanala has approved a three-storey building in Flemings Lane just off High Street, which will have eight bedrooms, two one bedroom apartments and one two bedroom apartment.

The teens living within the premises will be supervised by applicant Eileen O’Brien who will live on the ground floor of the premises.

The two one-bed apartments on the second floor would either be rented out or used for independent living for the teenagers as they reach adulthood.

The two-bed apartment will be on the third floor. There are also plans for balconies at second and third floor levels.

The proposed apartment building is contemporary in design with a mix of stone and render finish on the lower floors and synthetic burned timber finish on the upper floors. The second floor is recessed at the front and the third floor is recessed at the front and the rear with a decorative feature on the front elevation comprising dark grey timber steel poles. The building will also have a flat roof.

Planning permission was granted subject to 14 conditions including a two-metre high boundary wall to be constructed on south, south-western boundaries of the site and there’s to be no overnight commercial guest accommodation.

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Fans return to Fitzgerald Stadium after eight months

By Sean Moriarty Officials from Fitzgerald Stadium remain hopeful that crowd capacity at the venue can be increased to 500 spectators in time for the Munster final on July 25 – subject to both national health guidelines and Kerry qualifying for the game. Last Saturday evening’s National League semi-final between Kerry and Tyrone was the […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Officials from Fitzgerald Stadium remain hopeful that crowd capacity at the venue can be increased to 500 spectators in time for the Munster final on July 25 – subject to both national health guidelines and Kerry qualifying for the game.

Last Saturday evening’s National League semi-final between Kerry and Tyrone was the first game at the stadium since the 2020 Kerry Petroleum Intermediate Club Football Championship Quarter-Final when Glenbeigh-Glencar played Beaufort on October 4 last year.

Due to current restrictions only 200 fans were allowed attend Saturday’s big match. That will remain in place for Kerry’s opening Munster Championship tie with Clare on June 26.

“It had been more than eight months since Fitzgerald Stadium welcomed back fans to the venue,” stadium PRO Tatyana McGough told the Killarney Advertiser. “Everything went exceptionally well.”

She is hopeful that more restrictions will be eased on July 5, paving the way for an increase in capacity to 500 fans in time for the July 25 Munster Final.

“It is likely that from July 5 up to 500 spectators may be permitted to attend games. We hope this number will increase for the Munster Final. If it is a Cork versus Kerry Munster Final the game will be fixed for Sunday July 25 at 4pm in the Fitzgerald Stadium. The stadium’s staff are very confident in being able to host any number of fans that may be allowed.”

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