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Club tribute following tragic death of local talented footballer

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By Sean Moriarty

Legion GAA Club is this week in shock following the tragic death of one of the club’s best known and respected players.

Damien Lyne died in fall in the Whitebridge area of the town in the early hours of Saturday morning (April 10).

The Lyne family are steeped in Kerry GAA history. Damien’s brother Jonathan is a member of the current Kerry senior team and was a part of the team’s last All-Ireland victory in 2014.

Damien's grandfather Denny Lyne and grand-uncles Jackie and Michael Lyne also won All-Ireland SFC medals with the Kingdom. Denny captained Kerry in the 1947 All-Ireland final, the match famously played at the Gaelic Grounds in New York.

Damien was an accomplished footballer himself and was a member of the Legion side that won an U21 county title in 2012.

“Damien represented the club at every level, he played a pivotal role in our U21 county club championship victory in 2012,” said club PRO Elaine O’Donoghue.

“Damien will be sadly missed by his many friends and teammates throughout the club and beyond."

Club members were unable to accompany Damien on his final journey in accordance with current Government and HSE directives, and in the interest of public health a private funeral was held.

However, club members were asked to shine a light on their front windows at 9pm on Monday night as a mark of respect.

“Sincere and heartfelt thanks to everyone who united on Monday showing solidarity in challenging times for Damien’s final journey,” added Elaine.

A former student at St Brendan’s College and University College Cork, Damien represented The Sem at Munster Colleges level.

He is survived by his parents Geraldine and Denis, his brother Jonathan and sister Denise, girlfriend Tara, grandparents Arthur and Kit O'Keeffe, uncles, aunts, cousins and wide circle of friends.

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The tax you’re really paying for your health

By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?” In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word. We have it, and we use it, and, […]

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By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness

With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?”

In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word.

We have it, and we use it, and, of course we pay for it. We justify the constant ratcheting-up of our tax burden to pay for rising health-care costs. That tax is on our wallets.

We also pay another type of tax: When we’re unhealthy, we don’t get to do the things we like. When we’re overweight, we don’t always say “YES!” when our kids ask to go to the swimming pool.
When we’re unfit, we don’t take our buddy’s invitation for a weekend hiking and camping trip. We can’t start jogging because our knees hurt; can’t lift weights because our back hurts; can’t cut down calories because we feel we need the energy.

Those things are taxes. Physical taxes, but they’re not the worst taxes we pay.

The worst tax we pay is the mental tax.

When we’re self-conscious about our fitness or health, we don’t want to start exercising. We don’t want to look dumb or fail.

We don’t want to start a new lifestyle because our families will say “good for you”, because they know we need it, or they’ll say “you don’t need that …” and lie. Or they’ll roll their eyes because they know we’ve failed before.

When we’ve been away from the gym for four months, we don’t want to do that first workout because we’re going to be last. It’s going to suck and we might get embarrassed.

SELF IMPOSED TAX

The Government makes us pay financial tax, but the other two – physical and mental – are self-imposed.

No one cares if you’re slow.

No one cares if you finish last.

No one cares if you blow your nutrition this week and have to start all over again.

You’d stop caring about what others thought about you if you realised how rarely they actually do.

Everyone thinks about themselves, mostly. That’s the tax they’re paying – and most of us overpay.

We’re taxed enough. Stop worrying about what you look like and start caring about what makes you feel good.

If you’d like to start taking steps in the right direction with your health and fitness, call in for a free consultation with us at Activate. Visit www.activate.ie/free-intro for more information.

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Tractor run raises €500 for charity

By Sean Moriarty Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019. 30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980. Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019.

30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980.

Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ on Lewis Road, the convoy travelled to the communications mast near Coolick in Kilcummin, where participants enjoyed views of the wider Castleisland district and Killarney Valley.

“Some of the drivers were never up there before and they were amazed with the views across the two valleys,” organiser Tom Leslie told the Killarney Advertiser.

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