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Approach your job hunt with clear structure

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Searching for interesting new roles is often difficult and that is particularly the case for people who are embarking on the hunt for a job as we emerge slowly from COVID-19.

That’s why it’s crucial to have a solid structure for job hunting, to stay as positive as possible, to create a routine and to make the most of a period of career transition.

Working ‘smart’ on looking for a new job or a change of career will help to make the transition process as effective as possible. During COVID-19 we have all been encouraged to work through it by trying to maintain a regular daily routine - getting up the normal time, continuing with daily exercise and doing the positive things that help to stay in a positive mind-set. This also applies when looking for a job.

Allocate one to two hours each day to your job search:

The tasks will vary from day to day. Give yourself every chance of keeping positive about your search. Start a journal at the beginning of your search from a new job or a change of career and record your progress. Each day think of three things that you are grateful for from the previous day. Next list what are the two objectives you want to achieve during the day in relation to your job search such as update your CV, set up or update your online profile, reach out on LinkedIn to friends or associates who work in companies that you are interested in exploring for a job or listing all the people in your network who would be good to talk to you about your job search. Finally think about one thing that you look forward to at the end of the day – it could be cooking a nice meal for a friend, meeting someone for a coffee, watching a good film/series on Netflix or a phone call with someone you have not been in touch with for a while.

Outline your core skills:

How do you tell people what you do? Often we tend to talk about the industry we work in or describe our role in very specific terms that maybe not everyone is familiar with. The risk is that others may not understand what we’re referring to and be too nervous about asking us to explain it. It is important to think about how you can explain your current job role and describe your core skills so that anyone can understand, no matter what industry they’re in. Potential employers can then understand what you bring to the table.

Divide your role into three or four core components.

They could include things like project management, leadership, managing and developing staff, IT management, sales and customer services, client relationship management, communications management, design, financial management and reporting as well as many more. You want potential employers to know what skill set you have to offer and also see how transferable those skills are from one job to another.

Jot down one example of how you have used each of these skills/competencies using the following guide (STAR) which will also form part of your preparation for interviews when they arise.

S/T - Describe the Situation/Task you were dealing with
A – Detail the Actions you undertook – Use ‘I’ statements
R – Explain what the Result was including what you learned from the process.

In coming weeks we will explore how to identify your ideal role, how to enhance your profile and network effectively, what to include in your CV and Cover Letter and how to prepare for face-to-face or online interviews.

Niamh Dwyer, Guidance Counsellor in Scoil Phobail Sliabh Luachra, Rathmore & PRO of Kerry Branch of Guidance Counsellors. She can be contacted on careerfocusnow@gmail.com

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The tax you’re really paying for your health

By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?” In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word. We have it, and we use it, and, […]

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By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness

With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?”

In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word.

We have it, and we use it, and, of course we pay for it. We justify the constant ratcheting-up of our tax burden to pay for rising health-care costs. That tax is on our wallets.

We also pay another type of tax: When we’re unhealthy, we don’t get to do the things we like. When we’re overweight, we don’t always say “YES!” when our kids ask to go to the swimming pool.
When we’re unfit, we don’t take our buddy’s invitation for a weekend hiking and camping trip. We can’t start jogging because our knees hurt; can’t lift weights because our back hurts; can’t cut down calories because we feel we need the energy.

Those things are taxes. Physical taxes, but they’re not the worst taxes we pay.

The worst tax we pay is the mental tax.

When we’re self-conscious about our fitness or health, we don’t want to start exercising. We don’t want to look dumb or fail.

We don’t want to start a new lifestyle because our families will say “good for you”, because they know we need it, or they’ll say “you don’t need that …” and lie. Or they’ll roll their eyes because they know we’ve failed before.

When we’ve been away from the gym for four months, we don’t want to do that first workout because we’re going to be last. It’s going to suck and we might get embarrassed.

SELF IMPOSED TAX

The Government makes us pay financial tax, but the other two – physical and mental – are self-imposed.

No one cares if you’re slow.

No one cares if you finish last.

No one cares if you blow your nutrition this week and have to start all over again.

You’d stop caring about what others thought about you if you realised how rarely they actually do.

Everyone thinks about themselves, mostly. That’s the tax they’re paying – and most of us overpay.

We’re taxed enough. Stop worrying about what you look like and start caring about what makes you feel good.

If you’d like to start taking steps in the right direction with your health and fitness, call in for a free consultation with us at Activate. Visit www.activate.ie/free-intro for more information.

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Tractor run raises €500 for charity

By Sean Moriarty Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019. 30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980. Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019.

30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980.

Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ on Lewis Road, the convoy travelled to the communications mast near Coolick in Kilcummin, where participants enjoyed views of the wider Castleisland district and Killarney Valley.

“Some of the drivers were never up there before and they were amazed with the views across the two valleys,” organiser Tom Leslie told the Killarney Advertiser.

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