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Approach your job hunt with clear structure

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Searching for interesting new roles is often difficult and that is particularly the case for people who are embarking on the hunt for a job as we emerge slowly from COVID-19.

That’s why it’s crucial to have a solid structure for job hunting, to stay as positive as possible, to create a routine and to make the most of a period of career transition.

Working ‘smart’ on looking for a new job or a change of career will help to make the transition process as effective as possible. During COVID-19 we have all been encouraged to work through it by trying to maintain a regular daily routine - getting up the normal time, continuing with daily exercise and doing the positive things that help to stay in a positive mind-set. This also applies when looking for a job.

Allocate one to two hours each day to your job search:

The tasks will vary from day to day. Give yourself every chance of keeping positive about your search. Start a journal at the beginning of your search from a new job or a change of career and record your progress. Each day think of three things that you are grateful for from the previous day. Next list what are the two objectives you want to achieve during the day in relation to your job search such as update your CV, set up or update your online profile, reach out on LinkedIn to friends or associates who work in companies that you are interested in exploring for a job or listing all the people in your network who would be good to talk to you about your job search. Finally think about one thing that you look forward to at the end of the day – it could be cooking a nice meal for a friend, meeting someone for a coffee, watching a good film/series on Netflix or a phone call with someone you have not been in touch with for a while.

Outline your core skills:

How do you tell people what you do? Often we tend to talk about the industry we work in or describe our role in very specific terms that maybe not everyone is familiar with. The risk is that others may not understand what we’re referring to and be too nervous about asking us to explain it. It is important to think about how you can explain your current job role and describe your core skills so that anyone can understand, no matter what industry they’re in. Potential employers can then understand what you bring to the table.

Divide your role into three or four core components.

They could include things like project management, leadership, managing and developing staff, IT management, sales and customer services, client relationship management, communications management, design, financial management and reporting as well as many more. You want potential employers to know what skill set you have to offer and also see how transferable those skills are from one job to another.

Jot down one example of how you have used each of these skills/competencies using the following guide (STAR) which will also form part of your preparation for interviews when they arise.

S/T - Describe the Situation/Task you were dealing with
A – Detail the Actions you undertook – Use ‘I’ statements
R – Explain what the Result was including what you learned from the process.

In coming weeks we will explore how to identify your ideal role, how to enhance your profile and network effectively, what to include in your CV and Cover Letter and how to prepare for face-to-face or online interviews.

Niamh Dwyer, Guidance Counsellor in Scoil Phobail Sliabh Luachra, Rathmore & PRO of Kerry Branch of Guidance Counsellors. She can be contacted on careerfocusnow@gmail.com

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New Patient Advocacy Service offering support to Kerry people

A newly established Patient Advocacy Service is offering support to people in the Kerry area who want to make a complaint about the care they have received in a public hospital. The service provides free, independent and confidential information and support to people making a formal complaint about their care in a Health Service Executive […]

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A newly established Patient Advocacy Service is offering support to people in the Kerry area who want to make a complaint about the care they have received in a public hospital.

The service provides free, independent and confidential information and support to people making a formal complaint about their care in a Health Service Executive (HSE) funded public acute hospital.

People in the Kerry area looking for support can contact the Patient Advocacy Service confidential helpline on 0818 293003 to speak to a trained advocate who will help them to get information on the HSE’s complaints investigation process, called ‘Your Service, Your Say’.

The professionally trained independent advocate will support and empower the person making the complaint, with the aim of highlighting their views and concerns.

The advocate will explain to the person how to write a formal complaint and what to include in it. They will also help the person prepare for meetings with the HSE about their complaint, and they will help the person explore their options following a response from the HSE to their complaint.

“Until now, people in Kerry and across Ireland who experienced difficulties in the Irish health service often felt there was nowhere for them to turn,” Service Manager for the Patient Advocacy Service, Claire Lehane, said.

GUIDANCE

“The newly established Patient Advocacy Service offers patients the guidance and information they need to make a complaint when they are unhappy with the care they receive. It is free, independent and run by our professionally trained patient advocates who will use their compassion and knowledge to guide people through the HSE complaints process.”

The helpline is open Monday to Friday from 10am until 4pm, including lunchtimes. You can also email info@patientadvocacyservice.ie or for more information see patientadvocacyservice.ie.

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New Kerry Dublin flight takes off

By Sean Moriarty The Kerry-Dublin air route returned to the skies for the first time in nearly seven weeks today (Wednesday). Budget airline Ryanair has taken over the route following the collapse of Stobart Air on June 12. At around 1pm, one of Ryanair’s Boeing 737-800 aircraft landed at the airport after completing its 50 minute […]

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By Sean Moriarty

The Kerry-Dublin air route returned to the skies for the first time in nearly seven weeks today (Wednesday).

Budget airline Ryanair has taken over the route following the collapse of Stobart Air on June 12.

At around 1pm, one of Ryanair’s Boeing 737-800 aircraft landed at the airport after completing its 50 minute journey for Dublin.

Less than 25 minutes later it was back in the sky again for its return journey to the capital.

The flight will operate once a day until September 1 when the frequency will increase to twice daily.

“We are happy to report a positive start to the service which has been absent since early June,” the airport’s CEO John Mulhern told the Killarney Advertiser. “Ryanair intends to operate the route once a day until the end of August and has committed to restoring a twice-daily service from September.”

The route is operated on a commercial basis by Ryanair. Since 2011, Aer Lingus, through its subsidiary Aer Lingus Regional or its partners Aer Arran and Stobart Air operated the flight as a Government support Public Service Obligation (PSO). Previously, between 2008 and 2011 Ryanair operated the route on a commercial basis but withdrew at short notice as it could not make it profitable.

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