Connect with us

News

All-Ireland football star David Clifford graduates from University of Limerick

Published

on

All-Ireland winning Gaelic Football star David Clifford has graduated from University of Limerick today (Tuesday).

.

REPRO FREE 230822 All-Ireland winning football star David Clifford graduates from University of Limerick Press release (23/8/22) ***Repro free imagery will be sent to newsdesks by Arthur Ellis – 087-2884885 All-Ireland winning football star David Clifford has graduated from University of Limerick today (Tuesday). The Kerry GAA star forward was conferred with a Masters in PE Teaching at UL this Tuesday, among thousands of students receiving their parchments this week. The 23-year-old played a starring role in UL GAA’s Sigerson Cup Final run, claimed the Higher Education Rising Star Footballer of the Year Award, and was Man of the Match in the All-Ireland Football Final this year. A Silver Scholarship recipient at UL, David has been in the UL Sports Scholarships Academy for the past two years, allowing him access to the high-performance gym to keep up his demanding sporting regime while taking the course. The Kerry star is among almost 3,300 new graduates being conferred at UL over five days of the 2022 Autumn Conferring Ceremonies this week. Speaking ahead of his graduation, David Clifford said: “I couldn’t recommend it (the course) enough in terms of the time we were in college and the work placements that we had. The lecturers and the sports department were very accommodating and friendly, especially in helping me to balance my studies and our Sigerson Cup Final run. Coming up to Limerick was a bit daunting at first, but the sports facilities (at UL) alone are unbelievable.” Pictured is David Clifford in UL. Pic Arthur Ellis.

REPRO FREE 230822 All-Ireland winning football star David Clifford graduates from University of Limerick Press release (23/8/22) ***Repro free imagery will be sent to newsdesks by Arthur Ellis – 087-2884885 All-Ireland winning football star David Clifford has graduated from University of Limerick today (Tuesday). The Kerry GAA star forward was conferred with a Masters in PE Teaching at UL this Tuesday, among thousands of students receiving their parchments this week. The 23-year-old played a starring role in UL GAA’s Sigerson Cup Final run, claimed the Higher Education Rising Star Footballer of the Year Award, and was Man of the Match in the All-Ireland Football Final this year. A Silver Scholarship recipient at UL, David has been in the UL Sports Scholarships Academy for the past two years, allowing him access to the high-performance gym to keep up his demanding sporting regime while taking the course. The Kerry star is among almost 3,300 new graduates being conferred at UL over five days of the 2022 Autumn Conferring Ceremonies this week. Speaking ahead of his graduation, David Clifford said: “I couldn’t recommend it (the course) enough in terms of the time we were in college and the work placements that we had. The lecturers and the sports department were very accommodating and friendly, especially in helping me to balance my studies and our Sigerson Cup Final run. Coming up to Limerick was a bit daunting at first, but the sports facilities (at UL) alone are unbelievable.” Pictured is David Clifford in front of the Living Bridge in UL. Pic Arthur Ellis.

REPRO FREE230822All-Ireland winning football star David Clifford graduates from University of LimerickPress release (23/8/22)***Repro free imagery will be sent to newsdesks by Arthur Ellis – 087-2884885All-Ireland winning football star David Clifford has graduated from University of Limerick today(Tuesday).The Kerry GAA star forward was conferred with a Masters in PE Teaching at UL this Tuesday, amongthousands of students receiving their parchments this week.The 23-year-old played a starring role in UL GAA’s Sigerson Cup Final run, claimed the HigherEducation Rising Star Footballer of the Year Award, and was Man of the Match in the All-IrelandFootball Final this year.A Silver Scholarship recipient at UL, David has been in the UL Sports Scholarships Academy for thepast two years, allowing him access to the high-performance gym to keep up his demanding sportingregime while taking the course.The Kerry star is among almost 3,300 new graduates being conferred at UL over five days of the2022 Autumn Conferring Ceremonies this week.Speaking ahead of his graduation, David Clifford said: “I couldn’t recommend it (the course) enoughin terms of the time we were in college and the work placements that we had. The lecturers and thesports department were very accommodating and friendly, especially in helping me to balance mystudies and our Sigerson Cup Final run. Coming up to Limerick was a bit daunting at first, but thesports facilities (at UL) alone are unbelievable.”Pictured is David Clifford in UL. Pic Arthur Ellis.

The Kerry GAA star forward was conferred with a Masters in PE Teaching at UL this Tuesday, among thousands of students receiving their parchments this week.

The 23-year-old played a starring role in UL GAA’s Sigerson Cup Final run, claimed the Higher Education Rising Star Footballer of the Year Award, and was Man of the Match in the All-Ireland Football Final this year.

A Silver Scholarship recipient at UL, David has been in the UL Sports Scholarships Academy for the past two years, allowing him access to the high-performance gym to keep up his demanding sporting regime while taking the course.

The Kerry star is among almost 3,300 new graduates being conferred at UL over five days of the 2022 Autumn Conferring Ceremonies this week.

“I couldn’t recommend it [the course] enough in terms of the time we were in college and the work placements that we had," David, speaking ahead of his graduation, said.

"The lecturers and the sports department were very accommodating and friendly, especially in helping me to balance my studies and our Sigerson Cup Final run. Coming up to Limerick was a bit daunting at first, but the sports facilities [at UL] alone are unbelievable.”

On Monday, the first batch of students in Ireland to graduate with Masters level apprenticeships were conferred, with Minister of State for Skills and Further Education Niall Collins TD present to meet and congratulate them.

In her conferring address, Professor Mey has told the new UL graduates that the ceremonies are “a hugely important part of your learning journey”.

“As you step out into the world as our ambassadors by joining the more than 118,000 alumni around the world, we want you to be proud of your institution.”

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

Jim awarded for life-long service to the community

By Michelle Crean Listry local Jim O’Shea was honoured last week as members of the community council presented him with an award for his life-long service to the community. Jim […]

Published

on

0239442_3074647375917094526388053715041716181838917n.jpg

By Michelle Crean

Listry local Jim O’Shea was honoured last week as members of the community council presented him with an award for his life-long service to the community.

Jim received the O’Shea Award for 2022 at a meeting of Directors of Listry Community Council held on September 21.

Jim has been involved in Athletics from a very early age both as a competitor and administrator.

He was very much involved with Community Games in Milltown/Listry as organiser and coach. He was also involved with the Farranfore Maine Valley Athletic Club since its foundation.

Over the years Jim has competed in athletic events, mainly high jump and long jump, both in Ireland and abroad.

Recently he travelled to Derby in the UK in the British Masters Championship and won Gold in the 100 metres and Long Jump and finished second in the High Jump.

Jim, who is a very modest man, was actively involved with Listry Community Council as a volunteer driver for Meals on Wheels and for his commitment to keeping our community litter free by organising a number of litter picking days each year.

Always interested in fitness, Jim often came along to the Listry Seniors Social day and led the group in gentle exercises.

“Jim is a very worthy recipient of the O’Shea Award 2022 and we thank him for a lifetime of service to others,” Tony Darmody, Chairman, said.

Continue Reading

News

New book recounts stories from the Irish Civil War

The killing of 17-year-old Bertie Murphy in Killarney in September 1922 Historian and author, Owen O’Shea recounts one of the most shocking murders of the Civil War which occurred in […]

Published

on

0239736_H822_MP_No_Middle_Path_226x153_178_1-2.jpg

The killing of 17-year-old Bertie Murphy in Killarney in September 1922

Historian and author, Owen O’Shea recounts one of the most shocking murders of the Civil War which occurred in Killarney a century ago this week.

There were many tragic episodes and incidents during the Civil War in Kerry. One of the dreadful features of the conflict was the young age at which many on both sides of the conflict were killed in 1922 and 1923.

In Killarney in August 1922, for example, two young Free State army medics were shot dead by a sniper as they stepped off a boat onto the shore of Inisfallen Island. 18-year-old Cecil Fitzgerald and 20-year-old John O’Meara, both from Galway, had joined the army just a few months previously and were enjoying a boat trip on the lake during a day’s leave when they were killed.

The following month, one of the most shocking deaths to occur in Killarney in this period was the murder of a 17-year-old boy from Castleisland.

Bertie Murphy, a member of Fianna Éireann, the youth wing of the IRA, was just 17-years-old when he was taken into custody by Free State soldiers while walking near his home in September 1922. His mother saw him being taken in away in a truck to the Great Southern Hotel where the army had established its headquarters in the town.

The improvised barracks had a number of prison cells in the basement where anti-Treaty IRA members were detained. The prison would become renowned as a place where beatings and torture took place: a young man whose brother was an IRA captain was taken there and ‘mercilessly beaten to get him to reveal information’. He was then ‘thrown down a coal chute and left as dead’.

On Wednesday, September 27, a Free State army convoy was ambushed by the IRA at Brennan’s Glen on the Tralee road and two officers, Daniel Hannon and John Martin, were killed. Bertie Murphy had been in one of the army vehicles – he was being used by the army as a hostage in an attempt to prevent attacks by anti-Treaty forces. It was common for Free State convoys to carry a prisoner as a deterrent to IRA ambushes and attacks.

When the convoy returned to the hotel, they were met by Colonel David Neligan, one of the most ruthless members of the Kerry Command of the Free State army. Neligan had been a member of Michael Collins’ ‘Squad’ during the War of Independence and was an experienced and battle-hardened soldier.

Neligan demanded to know why the soldiers had not taken any prisoners during the ambush at Brennan’s Glen, in which two of his officers had died. The soldiers, in a frenzy following the ambush, threw Bertie Murphy down the steps of the hotel. In the presence of other soldiers, Neligan began to beat up Murphy at the bottom of the steps and then shot the prisoner. In her book, ‘Tragedies of Kerry’, Dorothy Macardle says that Murphy lived ‘until the priest came’, but died shortly after.

Another prisoner was in custody in the hotel at the time. Con O’Leary from Glenflesk was brought down from his cell to identify the dead man. But so extensive were Murphy’s facial injuries that O’Leary was unable to identify his fellow prisoner.

Newspaper reports wrongly reported that Murphy had been wounded during the engagement at Brennan’s Glen and had ‘succumbed to his injuries’ on returning to Killarney.

At Murphy’s inquest which was held a fortnight later, General Paddy O’Daly, the head of the Kerry Command, sympathised with Murphy’s family but insisted that Murphy had died in the ambush at Brennan’s Glen. He said his soldiers had done ‘everything humanly possible for the man’.

He reminded those present that deaths like Murphy’s were the fault of reckless IRA leaders who refused to accept the authority of the people. ‘It is the women and children’, he said, ‘that are suffering, and for all the suffering that is being endured those leaders are to blame’.

It would not be the last time that O’Daly and senior army officers in Kerry would cover up the actions of their soldiers in the county. Nor, sadly, would it be the last time that young men, on both sides of the divide, joined the long list of victims of the Civil War in the county.

Owen O’Shea’s new book, ‘No Middle Path: The Civil War in Kerry’ will be published by Merrion Press in mid-October and can be pre-ordered now on Amazon and at www.owenoshea.ie.

Continue Reading

LOCAL ADS

Last News

Advertisement

Sport

Trending