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783 COVID cases reported today

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There's been a huge increase in the number of COVID-19 cases  today (Wednesday) with 783 reported.

According to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre as of 8am today, 73 COVID-19 patients are hospitalised, of which 20 are in ICU. There's also been 13 additional hospitalisations in the past 24 hours.

“Throughout this pandemic, we have been mindful of the disproportionate impact the necessary public health measures have had on certain people in our society," Dr Tony Holohan, Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, said. "Unfortunately, this remains the case and we are continuing to see our young people suffer a great burden as they wait for their vaccinations."

INCREASES

Dr Ronan Glynn, Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, said: “The latest data is showing clear increases in incidence of disease right across the country. There is no question that the delta variant is having a considerable impact of transmission of COVID-19.

“Delta also appears to be presenting with a different variety of symptoms than we have seen with other variants, including headache, sore throat and blocked or runny nose. If you have any symptoms of a cold or flu it is vital that you isolate immediately and arrange a test.”

Professor Philip Nolan, Chair of the NPHET Irish Epidemiological Modelling Advisory Group said: “We know that the Delta variant is now responsible for most cases in Ireland and that it is at least twice as transmissible than the previous dominant variant. We have seen incidence increase significantly over the last two weeks, especially in unvaccinated groups. Infections are now growing at 2-4% per day. We can control this, and as we move towards a further reopening of society next week, it is important to remember that the public health advice that we all so familiar with is as effective in breaking the chains of transmission of the Delta variant as it has been throughout the pandemic. Avoid crowds, wear a mask, manage your contacts, keep your distance, meet outdoors where possible, and, if indoors, ensure that the room is well ventilated.”

Dr Cillian De Gascun, Medical Virologist and Director of the National Virus Reference Laboratory said: “While Delta prevalence continues to increase, the available data in relation to vaccine effectiveness continues to be reassuring. However, high levels of circulating virus in a partially vaccinated population increases the risk of emergence of virus variants. As such, it is vital that we continue to follow the other public health interventions until the majority of our population is vaccinated.”

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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