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783 COVID cases reported today

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There's been a huge increase in the number of COVID-19 cases  today (Wednesday) with 783 reported.

According to the Health Protection Surveillance Centre as of 8am today, 73 COVID-19 patients are hospitalised, of which 20 are in ICU. There's also been 13 additional hospitalisations in the past 24 hours.

“Throughout this pandemic, we have been mindful of the disproportionate impact the necessary public health measures have had on certain people in our society," Dr Tony Holohan, Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, said. "Unfortunately, this remains the case and we are continuing to see our young people suffer a great burden as they wait for their vaccinations."

INCREASES

Dr Ronan Glynn, Deputy Chief Medical Officer, Department of Health, said: “The latest data is showing clear increases in incidence of disease right across the country. There is no question that the delta variant is having a considerable impact of transmission of COVID-19.

“Delta also appears to be presenting with a different variety of symptoms than we have seen with other variants, including headache, sore throat and blocked or runny nose. If you have any symptoms of a cold or flu it is vital that you isolate immediately and arrange a test.”

Professor Philip Nolan, Chair of the NPHET Irish Epidemiological Modelling Advisory Group said: “We know that the Delta variant is now responsible for most cases in Ireland and that it is at least twice as transmissible than the previous dominant variant. We have seen incidence increase significantly over the last two weeks, especially in unvaccinated groups. Infections are now growing at 2-4% per day. We can control this, and as we move towards a further reopening of society next week, it is important to remember that the public health advice that we all so familiar with is as effective in breaking the chains of transmission of the Delta variant as it has been throughout the pandemic. Avoid crowds, wear a mask, manage your contacts, keep your distance, meet outdoors where possible, and, if indoors, ensure that the room is well ventilated.”

Dr Cillian De Gascun, Medical Virologist and Director of the National Virus Reference Laboratory said: “While Delta prevalence continues to increase, the available data in relation to vaccine effectiveness continues to be reassuring. However, high levels of circulating virus in a partially vaccinated population increases the risk of emergence of virus variants. As such, it is vital that we continue to follow the other public health interventions until the majority of our population is vaccinated.”

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The tax you’re really paying for your health

By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?” In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word. We have it, and we use it, and, […]

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By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness

With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?”

In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word.

We have it, and we use it, and, of course we pay for it. We justify the constant ratcheting-up of our tax burden to pay for rising health-care costs. That tax is on our wallets.

We also pay another type of tax: When we’re unhealthy, we don’t get to do the things we like. When we’re overweight, we don’t always say “YES!” when our kids ask to go to the swimming pool.
When we’re unfit, we don’t take our buddy’s invitation for a weekend hiking and camping trip. We can’t start jogging because our knees hurt; can’t lift weights because our back hurts; can’t cut down calories because we feel we need the energy.

Those things are taxes. Physical taxes, but they’re not the worst taxes we pay.

The worst tax we pay is the mental tax.

When we’re self-conscious about our fitness or health, we don’t want to start exercising. We don’t want to look dumb or fail.

We don’t want to start a new lifestyle because our families will say “good for you”, because they know we need it, or they’ll say “you don’t need that …” and lie. Or they’ll roll their eyes because they know we’ve failed before.

When we’ve been away from the gym for four months, we don’t want to do that first workout because we’re going to be last. It’s going to suck and we might get embarrassed.

SELF IMPOSED TAX

The Government makes us pay financial tax, but the other two – physical and mental – are self-imposed.

No one cares if you’re slow.

No one cares if you finish last.

No one cares if you blow your nutrition this week and have to start all over again.

You’d stop caring about what others thought about you if you realised how rarely they actually do.

Everyone thinks about themselves, mostly. That’s the tax they’re paying – and most of us overpay.

We’re taxed enough. Stop worrying about what you look like and start caring about what makes you feel good.

If you’d like to start taking steps in the right direction with your health and fitness, call in for a free consultation with us at Activate. Visit www.activate.ie/free-intro for more information.

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Tractor run raises €500 for charity

By Sean Moriarty Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019. 30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980. Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019.

30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980.

Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ on Lewis Road, the convoy travelled to the communications mast near Coolick in Kilcummin, where participants enjoyed views of the wider Castleisland district and Killarney Valley.

“Some of the drivers were never up there before and they were amazed with the views across the two valleys,” organiser Tom Leslie told the Killarney Advertiser.

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