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Make your feet look and feel great

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By Jill O'Donoghue from Killarney Toning and Beauty Studio

Finally it's that time of the year when we have to get our toes out and dust off the sandals and that means we have to prepare the feet for some sun and sand. Both men and women can treat themselves to pedicures!

They are important for many reasons as they help to enhance the feet by having the hard skin removed, old polish taken off and new polished perfectly applied. A deluxe pedicure can improve the circulation, reduce dead skin cells, and improve your mood. It generally makes the feet look and feel amazing. One of the added benefits of a pedicure is a boost of circulation to the foot and lower legs. Poor circulation can lead to numbness in the feet or swelled joints. The effects of our jacuzzi jets, hot water with tea tree and peppermint foot soak, followed up with a lower leg and foot massage, increases the blood flow around the body to improve joint mobility and helps to reduce swelling and pain.

Our feet are exposed to some harsh conditions, whether you're in high heels all day, wellie boots, hiking boots, runners etc, it's easy to forget to look after your feet. Having a pedicure should be considered a necessity not a luxury. This can help avoid a number of issues from cracked skin or painful calluses on feet to ingrown toenails. I hear from clients all the time that a pedicure can be incredibly relaxing and reduce stress. There is a blissful effect from the massage but it is also a great way to set time aside for you. It's a great way to feel pampered and relaxed with the added effect that the toe paint is a constant reminder of the feel-good factor long after the appointment.

The treatment is incredibly relaxing and highly recommended for everyone, old and young, male and female. We soak the feet in hot water with jacuzzi jets; this helps to soften the skin straight away. Our pedicure chair includes a back massager, then the nails are cut, filed and buffed. A nail drill is used if required to reduce thickened toenails. Cuticles are then trimmed, pushed back and old polish removed. The exfoliator is applied on the entire lower leg and foot, followed with foot rasping on the stubborn hard skin. A massage is performed on the lower leg and foot. You can then choose from a wide selection of OPI polishes, or Gelish UV polish can be applied for a longer lasting effect.

Finally, pedicures help promote your mental health. Just like massages, pedicures can help reduce stress. They are very relaxing and boost your confidence because they make your feet look and feel great.

For more information or to book an appointment please call Jill on 064 6632966.

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Lifestyle

Bamboo is hardy and easy to grow

By Debby Looney, our weekly gardening expert Is there such a thing as a plant which ticks every single box? I don’t think so. But a plant which is one of the most versatile I can think of is certainly bamboo. There is a bamboo for every need, and every type of garden, really, their […]

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By Debby Looney, our weekly gardening expert

Is there such a thing as a plant which ticks every single box? I don’t think so. But a plant which is one of the most versatile I can think of is certainly bamboo.

There is a bamboo for every need, and every type of garden, really, their only drawback is that they do not flower. On the other hand, they are hardy, easy to grow, evergreen, stay true to their size, provide sound, colour and movement, and are so unique they do not compete with other plants. The fact that they do not flower is, for me, one of their strengths, as they provide a beautiful backdrop for flowers in the summer and fill the emptiness in the winter without one having to worry about clashing colours!

CHOOSE CAREFULLY

Bamboo root systems are quite shallow, so while they do grow almost anywhere, they do best in fertile, moist, but not waterlogged, soil, which has been dug over. They benefit greatly from an annual mulch, and prefer to be sheltered from extreme wind. That said, I have a bamboo in a pot which dries out regularly, is forgotten about and gets the full force of the wind, but is still alive. Not growing, perhaps, but not dead either!
The important thing with bamboo is to choose carefully and do the research. There are a thousand plus varieties and some will naturalise and crowd out other plants. If you are in doubt, line a very large hole with strong plastic, into which you cut some drainage holes, this should keep your plant in check.

HARDY

The easiest and one of the largest bamboo is Pseudosasa japonica. It is classed as a runner, and needs space. I do a yearly trim around the rhizomes and this keeps it tidy. It has mid green, olive coloured culms, (stems of a bamboo), and dark green foliage growing to over 5m. It is incredibly hardy. A very popular bamboo is Phyllostachys nigra, the black bamboo – so called for its beautiful dark culms. It grows well in a large pot, but if it is planted in the ground it will reach 5m also. Another very hardy one to try is Phyllostachys aurea, the golden bamboo. Its canes are very recognisable, having a swelling below each node.
Medium sized bamboos, about 2m, are ideal for containers, or as screens. Fargesia dracocephala is a very hardy plant, which copes well with a level of neglect. It has dense, dark foliage which makes it ideal as a hedge. Fargesia ‘Jumbo’ is a firm favourite and with its arching habit it is very graceful.

EASIEST TO GROW

Yet another use for bamboo is groundcover and to this end Indocalamus tessellatus is possibly the easiest to grow and reaches a maximun of 1m tall. It will happily cover as much ground as you will give it. It is a bit of a slow starter if the soil is heavy, but once it gets going weeds don’t stand a chance! Another excellent choice is Sasa veitchii which is very dense and fast growing. Its leaves turn pale brown around the edges in winter, giving it a variegated appearance.
Lastly, there are a few unusual types to look out for. Shibatea kumasaca is a groundcover plant, which can be clipped into formal hedges and shapes as it makes small dense clumps. Chimonobambusa quadrangularis is a 3m tall specimen with square stems – it grows in distinct clumps and its leaves are very glossy, and, well, shaggy looking! Hibanobambusa ‘Shiroshima’ is a beautiful variegated plant, with vibrant yellow and green streaked leaves. It is extremely hardy.

So, whether you need a privacy screen, groundcover, specimen plant or pot plant, there is a bamboo out there for you!

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Lifestyle

Five tips for stress management

By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness We all have stress, whether at work, at home, with family or with friends. Sometimes specific things or circumstances can make us feel incredibly stressed out. Stress is a normal part of life, but the most important thing is responding to and managing it. So the next time that […]

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By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness

We all have stress, whether at work, at home, with family or with friends. Sometimes specific things or circumstances can make us feel incredibly stressed out.

Stress is a normal part of life, but the most important thing is responding to and managing it. So the next time that you are feeling stressed, try these five techniques for managing it:

1. Exercise regularly

Swift movement can help improve sleep and combat stress. Research shows that individuals who participated in moderate physical activity had half the perceived stress as those who did not participate. Physical activity may also cancel out some of the adverse effects of stress, including the impact on the immune system. Exercise causes the release of endorphins, so adding physical activity into your routine will also make you happier.

2. Practice parasympathetic activities such as meditation

Multiple studies have found that mindful meditation can reduce psychological stress and anxiety. Take five minutes to yourself in a quiet place to sit and breathe. Focus on the present moment. Don’t worry if your mind starts to wander to other thoughts. Simply acknowledge those thoughts and then let them go. Refocus and bring your attention back to the present moment.

3. Get adequate sleep 

Stress during the day affects the quality of our sleep at night. Even worse, insufficient sleep can affect both brain function and mood. Limit electronic device usage like smartphones and computers in the evening. Don’t consume caffeine late in the day, after 3 or 4pm. Try to get in the habit of waking up and going to bed consistently to ensure adequate nightly sleep. Finally, get moving during the day! Research suggests that physical activity can improve sleep and combat stress.

4. Eat a high-quality whole foods-based diet

When we are stressed, our central nervous system releases cortisol. Research has shown that high cortisol levels combined with high sugar consumption may cause fat to be deposited around our internal organs. This is called visceral fat, and it is associated with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Choose high-quality whole foods which will provide you with a variety of nutrients and health benefits. Aim to consume a diet full of colourful fruits and veggies daily!

5. Transform negative thoughts

Our thoughts influence our emotions, and our feelings affect our behaviours. Reframing your thoughts around the causes of stress can help you better control your emotions, which helps reduce perceived stress. Redirect negative energy and ideas into positive ones. Evaluate your expectations and learn to accept the situations that are outside of your control.

If you need to connect with a coach to help guide you, schedule a free consultation with us today by visiting our website www.activate.ie.

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