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Ukrainians hail the kindness of the Irish

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By Natalia Krasnenkova

War displaced Ukrainians had their first experience of the Ring of Kerry last weekend and it is fair to say that were well impressed.

COACH TOUR:Driver Con Riordan with his Ukrainian passengers on the Ring of kerry last weekend.Photo: Natalia Krasnenkova

Philip O’Callaghan of O’Callaghan Coaches & Chauffeur Services organised the trip for 50 Ukrainian

“I want to start immediately by thanking the organisers, thanks to whom this exciting journey took place,”said Yaroslava Shkurko, a teacher from Kyiv.

“I'll start with Maeve O’Connell, she works at our front desk. With Maeve, we practice learning English. It's nice to talk when she has a few minutes. When I jokingly called her my teacher, she was not confused and invited me to a lesson the next day.

“Very nice person, many thanks for the sincerity, positive attitude and desire to help solve any issues.

Of course, our driver Con Riordan is a model of tolerance and restraint. Watching us with interest, he always tried to be close and did his job perfectly, especially on the steep mountain parts of the route. We applaud.”

They visited Kerry bog village where they were able to get acquainted with the history and life of Irish society of the 19th century.

“It is nice to note that our village houses were also covered with reeds. And the interior decoration of houses is very similar to Ukrainian traditions,” added Yaroslava.

They stopped for lunch at O’Carroll’s Cove restaurant on the coast where there was another pleasant surprise. In addition to a wonderful dinner, they received a musical gift - a local band played several songs for them.

Ukrainians are a singing nation and repaid the locals for their hospitality with a mini concert of Ukrainian songs.

“I am so inspired by the nature of Ireland that I want to insert a memory card with a recording of a trip to the Ring of Kerry and review it over and over again. Green meadows, ivy-covered houses, mountains, lakes, the ocean. You would see my son rolling up his pants, running along the ocean, and my daughter throwing pebbles into the water. But the most important impression on me is made by the people who live here. This trip was a great gift for us, but most of the people who took part in it saw us for the first time. Now I see that I want to instil in my children the same kindness that I see every day in the Irish,” said Yulia Dolia from Kyiv.

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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