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Traffic wardens to tackle New Road motorists

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By Sean Moriarty

Traffic wardens are to take a more ‘on the ground’ approach to illegal parking and other traffic-related issues at a notorious traffic blackspot in the town.

The warning follows an online meeting on Wednesday between Killarney Gardai, Killarney Municipal District engineers and school principals in an effort to solve the ongoing illegal parking and traffic management issues on New Road at school times.

The street provides access to three secondary schools, two primary schools and one special needs facility - bringing an estimated 2,800 users to the area on a daily basis.

The street is also home to the Killarney offices of the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht, Killarney Garda Station and several private houses.

TRAFFIC PROBLEMS

Mayor of Killarney Brendan Cronin attended Wednesday’s online meeting to represent all of the elected members of KMD.

Traffic has been a problem in the area for years and even measures like imposing a temporary one-way system during school pick-up and drop-off times have not solved the issues.

“It was reported at the meeting that on one day alone, 40 cars disrespected the one-way system,” he told the Killarney Advertiser. “Anyone on the road will tell you it just takes one car to mess the place up.”

The situation has worsened in recent weeks; reduced capacity on school buses due to COVID-19 restrictions means there are now more school buses using the street and a marked increase in parents dropping children off as they cannot get spaces on school transport.

Problems include cars parking on footpaths forcing pedestrians out on to the street and cars parking in the designated bus drop-off zone, forcing buses to double park. Traffic wardens will target these two offences with immediate effect.

OUTCOME
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“One outcome of the meeting is that the executive will change the daily rota of the parking wardens so they can monitor this area,” added Mr Cronin. “Some people have a total disregard and they have to be dealt with.”

Killarney Municipal District engineer John Ahern also attended the online meeting. He will undertake a detailed assessment of the area and will report back to each of the schools.

He will examine several aspects, including school opening and closing times and the better use of nearby car parks like the under-used facility on Rock Road.

“This is by no means a simple task, there are so many stakeholders,” added Mr Cronin. “It was a very constructive meeting, we have defined targets and we will get this done.”

Although representatives of Bus Éireann have attended meetings in the past they did not attend Wednesday's meeting.

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Free creative workshop for children impacted by cancer

Cancer support charity, Recovery Haven Kerry, will host a free creative workshop for children impacted by cancer this coming Thursday (September 30). The online event has been organised to mark Childhood Cancer Awareness Month this September and will be facilitated by Recovery Haven Kerry deputy manager and art therapist, Katie O’Donoghue from Killarney. The workshop, which […]

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Cancer support charity, Recovery Haven Kerry, will host a free creative workshop for children impacted by cancer this coming Thursday (September 30).

The online event has been organised to mark Childhood Cancer Awareness Month this September and will be facilitated by Recovery Haven Kerry deputy manager and art therapist, Katie O’Donoghue from Killarney.

The workshop, which takes place via Zoom at 6.30pm, is aimed at children who have been impacted by cancer in any way and will also see Katie read from her debut children’s book, ‘‘The Little Squirrel Who Worried’.

Workshop facilitator, Katie, has worked for many years as a child and young people’s therapist with the NHS, before returning to her native Killarney this year. Her background is in fine art and design and she has a Masters degree in Art Psychotherapy.

If you would like to register your child for this free online workshop, please contact Recovery Haven Kerry on 066 7192122 to book your place.

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Not to be for Killarney as Waterford named Best Place to Live in Ireland

While Killarney made it through to the last five, in the end it was Waterford City which claimed the overall title of Best Place to Live in Ireland 2021. While the city was the unanimous choice of the judging panel it had to beat off stiff competition from Killarney and three other shortlisted locations: Clonakilty, […]

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While Killarney made it through to the last five, in the end it was Waterford City which claimed the overall title of Best Place to Live in Ireland 2021.

While the city was the unanimous choice of the judging panel it had to beat off stiff competition from Killarney and three other shortlisted locations: Clonakilty, Co Cork, Galway city and the village of Glaslough in Co Monaghan.

Among the things which impressed the judges about Waterford were its beautiful buildings, its liveability, its pedestrian friendly public space, its weather, and its easy access to the Comeragh Mountains and the Copper Coast.

The Chair of the judging panel Conor Goodman congratulated Killarney on its fine showing in the competition.

“Given the level of entries and the extremely high standard of those entries, making it into the Best 5 Places to Live in Ireland really is a wonderful achievement which I’m sure everyone in Killarney and Kerry is really proud of. We were delighted with the level of interest in the competition and would like to thank everyone who nominated a place or who engaged with us on it.”

The Irish Times Best Place to Live in Ireland contest, which is supported by Randox Health, began in June.

In total 470 locations were nominated by more than 2,400 people from all 32 counties for the title of ‘Best Place to Live in Ireland 2021’.

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