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Stupid tailgating

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EIGHTY kilometres from home on the final leg of a three-week 7,000km roadtrip taking in unrestricted Autobahn routes, nine Alpine passes, a few busy Italian cities and London’s M25 only to encounter the most dangerous leg of the journey – from Adare to Newcastlewest. Not a dangerous road but a dangerous driver. We all encounter stupid on the road and sometimes we do stupid and generally we can accept stupid as a one-off act but being stupid for a longer period of time is unacceptable.

On leaving the town of Adare I noticed in my rear-view mirror a young lady in a red VW Golf approach quite rapidly behind me. Bear in mind my journey to date and that home is close, I wasn’t hanging about. There was a long line of traffic entering Adare. An overtaking opportunity for her was greatly reduced.

She couldn’t set up an overtaking manoeuvre but she was still closing quickly until she reached the point that I was unable to see her car's headlights in my rear-view mirror. There are rules around this but I have a simple one, if I can’t see the number plate of the following car in my rear-view mirror, that car is in my space. Now we have a problem – she had well and truly entered my space. Standing in line for a rock concert, uncomfortable – 100kph in a car, absolutely looking to pick a fight. However I’m not that type of guy (on this occasion) so I slowed enough to let her pass when the opportunity presented itself.

A quick check in the mirror, she doesn’t seize the opportunity – in fact, she is looking to her left and appears to be texting. She is now driving her car using peripheral vision and my bumper as her reference. Now I am concerned, again I can’t see the headlights, that is how close she is. Her sixth sense has well and truly captured my attention.

My first attempt at creating distance didn’t work, so now I put another car between us. This only worked for a moment as that car pulled in. Maybe I should do the same but I just want to get home. However I tried it again on two more occasions but she followed on both and resumed tailgating.

On my last attempt to put distance, she races up to my bumper, this time drinking from a coffee cup and again looking to her left and still appears to be texting. For a brief moment when she looked out the windscreen I seized the opportunity to signal my concerns. A tip on the brake pedal – enough to engage the brake lights but not to slow my progress.

Her reaction caused her to spill the contents of her coffee cup on herself and drop her phone. Putting aside my fear of a potential accident I am impressed at her ability to multitask; tailgate, text and take on refreshments, all at 100kph.

Unfortunately this spillage has given her something else to do while tailgating and texting. However once all cleaned up, normal activities resume, back to texting and, oh yes, tailgating. I am impressed.

Newcastlewest only a few kilometres away; on safety grounds it may be time to concede and pull over. Thankfully on entering the first roundabout she took the first exit and removed herself from our route.

The sense of relief that this short, but potentially dangerous, journey was over, but it is only beginning for someone else. This person is a danger to herself and other road users and there is only one outcome and it is a serious accident. And it will happen, statistics prove it. Be safe on the roads – DON’T TAILGATE – FOR YOUR OWN SAKE…

On a final note, in an accident tailgaters are 100% liable no matter what the circumstances – period.

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Gaelscoil pupils compete in Fleadh for the first time

By Michelle Crean It was their first time entering Fleadh Cheoil Chiarraí but Gaelscoil Faithleann pupils proved they’ve got talent as they made it to the next stage of the […]

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By Michelle Crean

It was their first time entering Fleadh Cheoil Chiarraí but Gaelscoil Faithleann pupils proved they’ve got talent as they made it to the next stage of the competition.

Muinteoir Treasa Uí Scannláin and Muinteoir Lisa Ni Iarlaithe prepared the children over the last two months on Thursday evenings after school.

For the competition 22 kids were entered in the Under 11 and 13 categories in the Comhra Gaeilge competition in Tralee.

Three of the Under 11s and three of the school’s Under 13s are now going forward to represent Chiarraí the Fleadh Cheoil na Mumhan in Newcastle West on July 15.

“The standard was very high and it was our first time entering this competition. All of the children were representing Cill Airne Comhaltas,” Lisa said.

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Kilcummin has strong representation in Fleadh Cheoil Chiarraí

Fleadh Cheoil Chiarraí may have been absent in the live sense over the previous two years, however it returned over the last two weekends and it delivered with aplomb! The […]

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Fleadh Cheoil Chiarraí may have been absent in the live sense over the previous two years, however it returned over the last two weekends and it delivered with aplomb!

The home of Kerry Comhaltas, the Dúchas Centre on the MTU campus in Tralee, was the host venue on the first weekend of the Fleadh, which accommodated the dancing competitions.

“We were spoiled with the spectacle of live dancing of the highest calibre accompanied by live music from accomplished musicians … food for the soul!” Derek O’Leary, Kilcummin CCE PRO, said.

“Much credit and thanks goes to the Moriarty School of Dancing, Mary, John and Adrian who represented Kilcummin CCE and prepared our teams to compete at the highest level.

“We also had such a great weekend in the singing and music competitions over the second weekend of Fleadh Cheoil Charraí, held in the Dúchas Centre and other areas of the MTU campus. All of our competitors performed to the highest standard in robust competition. Well done to all who competed and congratulations to all who go forward to represent Chiarraí the Fleadh Cheoil na Mumhan, in Newcastle West, Co. Limerick from July 10 to 16.”

Kilcummin had strong representation throughout the dancing competition during the first weekend of Fleadh Cheoil Chiarraí.

U12 Ladies 1st place and County Champions.

“Well done to our second U12 Ladies set who weren’t placed but danced beautifully.”

U12 Mixed 1st place & County Champions.
U12 mixed 2nd place.
15-18 Mixed 2nd place.
15-18 Ladies & Mixed Half set 3rd place
U12-15 Ladies 3rd place
Senior mixed half set 1st place and County Champions
Over 35’s 1st Place & County Champions

Kilcummin also excelled in the music and singing competitions of the second weekend of the Fleadh.

Eoin Foley – Accordion 1st place
Eoin Foley – Melodeon 2nd place
Aisling O’Connor – 1st place – Ladies O18 English Singing
Liam Kerrisk – 1st place – 15-18 Melodeon
Michael Healy – Button accordion (12-15) 1st place
Michael Healy – Melodeon (12-15) 1st place
Sean Butler – Button Accordion (12-15) 2nd place
Colleen Anland and Michael Healy – Duets (12-15) 1st place
Seán Fleming – Kerry Comhaltas U15 History Project 1st place

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