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Road closure angers business owners

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DIVERSION: Essential road works will close a portion of the Ring of Kerry road for two weeks.

 

By Sean Moriarty

Angry business owners this week say a move by Kerry County Council to close a portion of the Ring of Kerry road - just as the tourist season gets into full swing – will be detrimental to their business and put jobs at risk.

The Council have decided to close the N71 Ring of Kerry road between Torc Waterfall and the car park for Dinis Cottage from this Monday (June 24) until July 5 to facilitate emergency repairs to a section of the retaining wall and road at Dinis.

There has been widespread disbelief by the people of Killarney and the business community  following the announcement.

In recent weeks a stop-go traffic light system was in place to keep traffic away from the partially collapsed wall.

Contractors engaged will carry out the works at night “to minimise the duration of the road closure” according to a Kerry County Council statement.

A diversion will be in place via the N22 (Cork Road) and Kilgarvan (R569) and advisory signage will be erected.

One of the tourist businesses effected by the closure is the craft shop at Ladies View. Owner Raymond O’Shea said he understood the work has to be done but expressed disappointment at the timing. His business depends on passing trade and he also said staff would suffer too.

“Safety of the road users is paramount and it would be a lot worse if there was a tragic accident there or if the road collapsed fully and we were closed for six months or more,” he told the Killarney Advertiser. “We have no control over the works but it is going to affect business. We depend on passing trade and won’t have any during the works. We have a good team here, but they won’t get their full hours either during the works.”

The franchisee at Dinis Cottage, Denise O’Sullivan, said the closure will be detrimental to her business. She employs up to 12 people during peak hours, but has taken the decision to reduce her staff to just two people during the works.

Her business is further damaged as National Park staff have taken the extra decision to close the cycle path to the cottage. Cyclists observe a one-way system to access the cottage but with the return road via the N71 now closed it is not possible to allow cyclists start the route.

“It will be detrimental to my business,” she told the Killarney Advertiser. “I am not sure it is worth staying open for the two weeks. I will have to wait and see what happens. The timing of this is ridiculous and the info we have been getting is very limited. I found out on social media. The majority of my customers come from the car park which is closed and now they have cut off the access for the cyclists too.”

Access will be maintained from Killarney to Muckross House, Torc Waterfall and the ‘Cardiac Steps’ walkway.

Access to Ladies’ View and Moll’s Gap will be maintained from the Kenmare/Sneem side.  The only way to access the car park for Dinis Cottage from Killarney is to make the long journey via Kilgarvan and Kenmare.

“Kerry County Council, in consultation with the contractor, is endeavouring to minimise the duration of the road closure, in particular for local businesses, tourism operators and the upcoming Ring of Kerry Cycle which is scheduled to take place on Saturday, July 6,’ said a Council statement.

 

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The tax you’re really paying for your health

By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?” In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word. We have it, and we use it, and, […]

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By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness

With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?”

In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word.

We have it, and we use it, and, of course we pay for it. We justify the constant ratcheting-up of our tax burden to pay for rising health-care costs. That tax is on our wallets.

We also pay another type of tax: When we’re unhealthy, we don’t get to do the things we like. When we’re overweight, we don’t always say “YES!” when our kids ask to go to the swimming pool.
When we’re unfit, we don’t take our buddy’s invitation for a weekend hiking and camping trip. We can’t start jogging because our knees hurt; can’t lift weights because our back hurts; can’t cut down calories because we feel we need the energy.

Those things are taxes. Physical taxes, but they’re not the worst taxes we pay.

The worst tax we pay is the mental tax.

When we’re self-conscious about our fitness or health, we don’t want to start exercising. We don’t want to look dumb or fail.

We don’t want to start a new lifestyle because our families will say “good for you”, because they know we need it, or they’ll say “you don’t need that …” and lie. Or they’ll roll their eyes because they know we’ve failed before.

When we’ve been away from the gym for four months, we don’t want to do that first workout because we’re going to be last. It’s going to suck and we might get embarrassed.

SELF IMPOSED TAX

The Government makes us pay financial tax, but the other two – physical and mental – are self-imposed.

No one cares if you’re slow.

No one cares if you finish last.

No one cares if you blow your nutrition this week and have to start all over again.

You’d stop caring about what others thought about you if you realised how rarely they actually do.

Everyone thinks about themselves, mostly. That’s the tax they’re paying – and most of us overpay.

We’re taxed enough. Stop worrying about what you look like and start caring about what makes you feel good.

If you’d like to start taking steps in the right direction with your health and fitness, call in for a free consultation with us at Activate. Visit www.activate.ie/free-intro for more information.

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Tractor run raises €500 for charity

By Sean Moriarty Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019. 30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980. Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019.

30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980.

Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ on Lewis Road, the convoy travelled to the communications mast near Coolick in Kilcummin, where participants enjoyed views of the wider Castleisland district and Killarney Valley.

“Some of the drivers were never up there before and they were amazed with the views across the two valleys,” organiser Tom Leslie told the Killarney Advertiser.

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