Connect with us

News

Relief for students as State exams finally begin

Published

on

Killarney Community College students Stefan Lajdar said it was easy enough once he got going.

Aoife O'Brien student of Killarney Community College said the first exam wasn't too bad.

Bharragh O'Shea from Killarney Community College felt his first exam went pretty well. "I thought it was easy."

Happy to get it over and done with was Adam O'Connor from The Sem.

Kayleigh O'Connor and Bethany Kelly pictured ahead of their Home Economics exam on Wednesday afternoon.

By Michelle Crean and Grigoriy Geniyevskiy

Although it was a Leaving Cert like no other - that didn't stop some students from feeling nerves and others relief - as they finally began their State exams on Wednesday morning.

After a mix of homeschooling due to the COVID lockdowns, it was a tough final year for the Sixth Years who at times had no idea if they final school exams would even go ahead.

Some have opted for no exams, while others want a mixture of Accredited Grades combined with the option to sit the exams.

And it all began on Wednesday morning as English Paper 1 was first up followed by Home Economics in the afternoon.

REACTION

For Killian O'Brien, a student in St Brendan's College, he said that there was no stress as he headed in.
"I'm grand out, not stressed at all."

George Griffin, also a student in St Brendan's College was glad to begin the final leg of his school journey and said he too felt grand about it.

"Predictable grades are a good backing to it, it levels out the stress."

His classmate Darren Counihan was "not too worried" about what was ahead of him.

"You can only go up in points, not down thanks to accredited points."

Luke Tindall, also a student in the school said he was alright and "not too stressed"

For Adam O'Connor there was some nerves.
"I'm feeling a bit of everything, but mostly stressed," he said. "I'm just waiting to get it done and over with."

In Killarney Community College Oliwia Bielanska spoke to the Killarney Advertiser after coming out of her first State exam.

"I was nervous at first, but once I started writing it was all good."

Aoife O'Brien from the same school said she was "kind of nervous" but that "it was fine".

"It wasn't too bad."

Stefan Lajdar, also a student in Killarney Community College said it went "alright".

"I finished a bit earlier. I was a bit under pressure before the exam, but it was easy enough. We have a backup with the predicted grades so it was fine."

A turbulent year

Principal of Killarney Community College, Stella Loughnane, acknowledged the uniqueness of this year. "This year has been a turbulent and emotional year for this particular Leaving Cert group. Thankfully, all of our students sitting these exams have the security of knowing they already have an accredited grade from their subject teacher and can really try to improve on that when sitting their chosen exams. I think this is of great comfort to students and will ease some of their nerves.The majority of our students have embraced this challenge and chosen to sit their exams."

She added that also this year there are a lot more COVID guidelines from both the Department of Health and the Department of Education that both the school and students must adhere to.

"This year has shown how adaptable our students are, therefore I don't believe they will cause too much fuss. However, like every other year, our students arrived with the age old butterflies in their stomachs but a willingness to begin their exams."

Sean Coffey, Principal of St Brendan's College said it was great to see the exams finally underway.

"It has been the most incredible two years for the students. This is as fair as you can get really. I would say the Sixth Years had a less disruptive year than other students as they had their eye on the prise and could see the finish line in sight."

Killarney Community College student Stefan Lajdar said it was easy enough once he got going.

Aoife O'Brien student of Killarney Community College said the first exam wasn't too bad.

Bharragh O'Shea from Killarney Community College felt his first exam went pretty well. "I thought it was easy."

Happy to get it over and done with was Adam O'Connor from The Sem.

George Griffin from St Brendan's College pictured before Wednesday's English exam.

Darren Counihan student from St Brendan's College said that he was not too worried ahead of the first exam on Wednesday.

Killian O'Brien from St Brendan's College said he wasn't feeling stressed before the first exam on Wednesday morning.

Katerina Polyakova and Maryia Casey from Killarney Community College pictured cramming in some last minute revision before Wednesday's Home Ec exam.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

Published

on

0244177_PATOSULLIVAN0577-Edit72.jpg

By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

Continue Reading

News

Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

Published

on

0244631_Blanket_2022.JPG

By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

Attachments

Continue Reading

LOCAL ADS

Last News

Advertisement

Sport

Trending