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Reidys granted access in laneway dispute

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A Circuit Court Judge has this week granted a local business access to a laneway in a dispute between business people in Killarney.

Reidy’s Bar on Main St., needs access to the laneway as a fire escape to comply with fire officer regulations, the court in Killarney heard on Tuesday.

Barrister Elizabeth Murphy had sought an injunction on behalf of David Downey, and Kq Accommodation, a limited company, operating JM Reidy's to force the respondents Donal Culloty, Lynda Culloty, Sean Coyne & Company Limited of No 1 and 2 Main Street, and Gerald O'Sullivan of the Caragh Restaurant, at the corner of New Street and Main Street, to allow an emergency exit through a door which has a false front, onto Main Street.

Judge Terence O’Sullivan granted the interlocutory application - a holding mechanism until the issues are fully tried - because on balance there would be a level of inconvenience including a fire hazard.

Reidy’s was originally a sweet shop and small bar and is a protected structure, but in recent years has been transformed into “a super pub”, the court heard.

There was “a huge degree of dispute” with neighbouring businesses over the exit, the judge noted.

At one point the barrister for Sean Coyne and Co., and others, claimed the operators of Reidy’s, which has now grown to cater for 800 patrons, were “riding roughshod” over other users of the lane and had no right to the lane or the exit.

But Reidy’s had never abandoned the right of way via the laneway, barrister for Reidy's, Elizabeth Murphy said.

“We are not claiming ownership, but we are claiming a right of way,” Ms Murphy said.

Approaches from her clients to unblock access to allow exit “in the unlikely event of a fire”, had met with no meeting of minds, and the matter was being “savagely contested", Ms Murphy said.

She handed deeds dating to 1900 into court, showing the existence of the laneway.

She vigorously denied claims about lack of planning and licensing by the respondents.
Eliza Kelleher, barrister for the respondents, opposing the application, said the old Reidy's bar did not even have alcohol on tap.

“It was just cans and bottles and a gift shop alongside run by Michael’s sister Marie,” Ms Kelleher said.

Out the back were considerable yards and stables.

“But the extension by the company is such it now caters for 800 patrons on the premises. There are two bars in front and four in the stables and sheds out the back as well as two courtyards and an awning. The premises has been transformed from what it was originally.

“The fact is there has been a change, an utter change of use. There has been no application to extend the licence,” Ms Kelleher further claimed, which was denied.

And while the number of fire exits for the first extensions had been adequate "extra ,extra expansion" in 2018 had necessitated this further exit, she also said.

The court was told how inside Reidy’s there was a sign over a hefty door saying “Emergency Exit. Keep Clear at all times!” which was “like a Guinness sign”, the judge remarked.

The sign was erected by the pub operators and there was actually no-where to go since the gate was locked since the 1970s, when her clients redeveloped the site, and replaced the old gate, locking it, and in 1985 erecting a false front, Eliza Kelleher said.

Reidy’s did not have keys and Mr Sheehan had been a friend of Sean Coyne, now retired. They had golfed together and he had never sought a key or access, Ms Kelleher outlined.

The gates were there always and they had never been used, it was claimed.

Ms Kelleher said Reidy’s were “riding roughshod over the people in this lane".

Judge Terence O’Sullivan granted the interlocutory application until the issues are fully tried.

He said that the “readily openable door” from Reidy's ultimately onto Main Street to act as a fire escape will have to be allowed within seven days. A simple mechanism like a bar might do it, and Reidy’s offered to meet the expense.

There is to be a full and early court hearing.

 

 

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County Board open to GAA museum proposals

By Sean Moriarty The Kerry County GAA Board said it would operate “an open door policy” for any plans to build a GAA museum in the county. There have been talks at a political level to build such a museum in Kerry with political rivals in Killarney and Tralee both pushing for it to be built […]

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By Sean Moriarty

The Kerry County GAA Board said it would operate “an open door policy” for any plans to build a GAA museum in the county.

There have been talks at a political level to build such a museum in Kerry with political rivals in Killarney and Tralee both pushing for it to be built in their home town.

Before he retired from politics in April, Michael Gleeson was campaigning to build a GAA and cultural museum on the grounds of Fitzgerald Stadium.

His campaign goes back several years before the recession set in, with a €0.5 million bridging loan secured from Croke Park along with funding from Fáilte Ireland. That funding was lost with the onset of the recession before 2010.

Tim Murphy, the outgoing chairman of the Kerry County Board, has confirmed to the Killarney Advertiser that no approaches have been made to the County Board at executive level during his five year stint at the helm.

However, he said the Board would be open to such approaches provided there is sound financial planning behind the project in place.

“The first and most important aspect is the capital funding and my understanding is there needs to be Fáilte Ireland funding in place first,” he told the Killarney Advertiser. “If it gets up and running, there needs to be very clear talks with all stakeholders so everyone knows each others expectations. A museum attracts footfall, but it costs a lot of money to run. We would offer an open door policy to all proposals but funding, first from a capital point of view and then from an operational point of view, will need to be in place.”

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Loreto pupils are happy to help save the planet

By Michelle Crean School pupils are fast becoming the next generation of environmentalists thanks to a brand new litter-picking campaign. Happy to help save the planet one bit of litter at a time are the children from Scoil Bhríde, Loreto NS, who are currently partaking in the Picker Pal Programme. It’s all about taking on […]

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By Michelle Crean

School pupils are fast becoming the next generation of environmentalists thanks to a brand new litter-picking campaign.

Happy to help save the planet one bit of litter at a time are the children from Scoil Bhríde, Loreto NS, who are currently partaking in the Picker Pal Programme.

It’s all about taking on a litter-picking adventure in their local area as well as learning songs, reading storybooks, filling in activity books while witnessing that their real-world actions are making a positive difference and inspiring others to join the movement.

Picker Pals is a unique primary school programme that gives children the tools and motivation to become the next generation of environmentalists, teacher Claire O’Meara explained.

“The Picker Pal Programme is a fantastic initiative and will go a long way to raise awareness of the impact litter has on our environment,” she told the Killarney Advertiser.

Real litter-picking is motivated by a Picker Pack made from upcycled dinghy sails and containing adult and child litter-picking tools, gloves, hi-vis vests and safety information.

“This pack is then taken home by a different pupil every week. That child takes their adult on a litter-picking adventure. The children then tell the story of their litter-picking adventures through art and writing. Raising awareness is an essential part of the solution to littering. Picker Pals gives young people the tools and positive motivation to steward their local environment and make the world a better place.”

The programme, run by environmental NGO VOICE Ireland, is funded by the Department of the Environment, Climate and Communications and various local authorities across Ireland.

Now in its third year of operation, over one thousand schools all across Ireland will be taking part in the Picker Pals programme this year. In Kerry, 29 schools are taking part, and Scoil Bhríde, Loreto is delighted to be included, she added.

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