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Pupils and staff say farewell to principal Paul

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By Michelle Crean

A much loved school principal got a great send off last week ahead of beginning a new role with the National Council for Special Education.

FAREWELL: Paul Favier pictured with the school's Board of Management on his last day as principal of Glenflesk National School.

Staff, pupils, the Board of Management, parents, family members and Fr Nicholas Flynn gathered in Glenflesk National School to say a final farewell to Paul Favier who has been with the school for 11 years.

A number of presentations and speeches were made followed by tea and cake.

"Paul is moving on to a new job as a Special Educational Needs Organiser 'SENO'," Michael McGillicuddy, a member of the Board of Management told the Killarney Advertiser.

"We had speeches, the Board of Management made a presentation, the staff also made a presentation and the children presented him with a scrapbook that they had made. We had invited Paul's parents Dan and Marian, his sister Danielle and his brother Ollie whose children attend the school."

There was also a night out in Spillane's in Barraduff that weekend, he added.

Michael added that Paul worked very hard in the school over the years.

"He did more than what the job entailed, he put in a lot of work behind the scenes. He was the chairperson of Erasmus and organised all the trips away and generated a lot of money that way. He'll be greatly missed."

Next week the school will welcome Michael O'Sullivan from Kilcummin who will take up the role of principal.

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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