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New Year’s resolutions from the garden

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New Year’s Resolutions...are you the type who rolls their eyes when this is mentioned?

Me? Well, I am one of those people who has an unattainable list of goals, an unrealistic idea of how I might change for the better, and, in 11 months’ time, a list of resolutions identical or longer, than the previous one!
So, this year, no New Year’s resolutions for me. However, I am going to make a change, well, carry on and improve on a change we, as a family, have already started, which is to have a more plant--based diet.
Following on from this, as I have written previously, I hope to have another, sustainable go at the veg garden. With this in mind, I have had a look at various catalogues online for seeds, I particularly like Irish Seedsavers, which are a company based in Clare.
They encourage open pollination, saving your own seeds and promoting heirloom and Irish varieties oF apples, fruit and veggies.
They also run excellent workshops – from setting up your polytunnel to making skincare products.
Needless to say, all organic, as is my other go-to for seeds and especially potatoes, Fruithill Farm based in Bandon. Fruithill Farm is exclusively organic, and apart from seeds sell organic pest and weed controls. I mention these two resources, not because they are paying me, (ha! that would be nice!), but because I am so often asked where to buy organic Irish produce.
It is a bit early to do anything outside other than to cover the beds with black polythene or weed suppressant in preparation for the spring, but inside you can sprout greens or grow micro greens while you wait.
To grow sprouting seeds, all you need is seeds, I recommend using organic ones, and a jar, or a special sprouting tower. Sprinkle a small amount of seeds, such as kale, alphalpha, fenugreek or radish, on the tray if using the sprouting tower, or in the base of a jar.
Chickpeas, lentils, sunflower seeds and mungbeans can be used too – just be aware that a small amount goes a long way! Place in a bright spot, and rinse the seeds twice a day, leaving a small amount of water in the jar – it will automatically stay in the sprouting trays. Within a few days your seeds will be ready to eat. A handy trick for sprouting mungbeans is to soak them overnight to start the process. Then place them in a muslin cloth, or cheesecloth, the size of a hanky, and tie the 4 corners together. Place in a bowl and rinse twice daily.
As the beans begin to sprout loosen the corners slightly. Keep them in a press, or somewhere dark, at room temperature. When the beans are fairly tightly packed together, they sprout a bit stubbier than you would normally see them in the supermarket, which makes them more nutrient dense, crisper and sweeter.
Microgreens are very easy to grow indoors now also, a seed tray with two-centimetre depth of compost is all you need. Peas, sunflower, kale and fenugreek are my favourite plants to use. Soak peas overnight before placing them close together on the compost. Cover with one-centimetre of compost and place something such as a piece of plastic and a magazine on them for about two days. Peas need to feel a bit of pressure to germinate! When they are ready to cut for use, they will give you a second crop within a week.
I hope that, like myself, you are optimistic for the New Year, and that rather than making personal resolutions, we might make promises which will help our health, mental and physical wellbeing as well as helping our planet.
Happy New Year!

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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