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Log into Student Portal to receive Calculated Grades

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Following the announcement by Minister for Education Norma Foley that the results of Calculated Grades will be issued to Leaving Cert students on Monday, September 7, the Calculated Grades Student Portal for such students is open until tomorrow (Monday July 27).

Through this portal, all Leaving Cert students will need to confirm that they wish to receive their Calculated Grades results on September 7. All students who registered from the Calculated Grades back in May should have received a text message about the opening of the Portal and it is critical to log on to www.gove.ie/leavingcertificate and confirm ahead of the deadline on July 27.

Following the release of the results, CAO Round 1 offers will be issued to applicants on Friday September 11. A 2020 CAO Offers and Acceptance schedule is now available on www.cao.ie/index.php?page=offerdates. The release of the results on September 7 does mean that they will also be available in time for any students who have applied to universities in the UK through the UCAS system.

Uncertainty

However, there is great uncertainty for students who have applied to European universities. The release of the Calculated Grades is likely to be too late for entry in some countries such as Denmark and the Netherlands, both of whom have become hugely popular for Irish students, as the deadline for submission of results is August 31. The advice for students who have applied is to contact the admissions office of the college directly as it is suggested by European University Central Application Support Service (EUNICAS) that some flexibility may by facilitated regarding the delay with Calculated Grade results. See www.eunicas.ie for the most up-to-date information on applications to Europe.

There has been widespread disappointment amongst students and parents that the results, which are usually issued mid-August, have been delayed by three weeks. There is particular concern around the pressure to organise accommodation and the uncertainty in relation to how the different colleges intend to deliver their programmes in the first semester. It remains to be seen if other colleges will follow the plan by UL to have students on campus for only one week in three. So, for the Class of 2020 as well as all students returning to third level institutions, this autumn uncertainty prevails.

Appeals

All students, whether they opted to receive the Calculated Grades or not, will have the option of taking the Leaving Certificate examination later in the year. It is hoped that they can be run in November but that is subject to public health advice at the time and it will be too late for students wishing to start their college courses in 2020. Any student who is unhappy with a Calculated Grade in any subject can seek an appeal and also opt to take the written exam in that subject. Applications for appeals will open on September 14.

Niamh Dwyer is a Guidance Counsellor in Scoil Phobail Sliabh Luachra, Rathmore & PRO of Kerry Branch of Guidance Counsellors. She can be contacted on careerfocusnow@gmail.com.

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The tax you’re really paying for your health

By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?” In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word. We have it, and we use it, and, […]

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By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness

With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?”

In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word.

We have it, and we use it, and, of course we pay for it. We justify the constant ratcheting-up of our tax burden to pay for rising health-care costs. That tax is on our wallets.

We also pay another type of tax: When we’re unhealthy, we don’t get to do the things we like. When we’re overweight, we don’t always say “YES!” when our kids ask to go to the swimming pool.
When we’re unfit, we don’t take our buddy’s invitation for a weekend hiking and camping trip. We can’t start jogging because our knees hurt; can’t lift weights because our back hurts; can’t cut down calories because we feel we need the energy.

Those things are taxes. Physical taxes, but they’re not the worst taxes we pay.

The worst tax we pay is the mental tax.

When we’re self-conscious about our fitness or health, we don’t want to start exercising. We don’t want to look dumb or fail.

We don’t want to start a new lifestyle because our families will say “good for you”, because they know we need it, or they’ll say “you don’t need that …” and lie. Or they’ll roll their eyes because they know we’ve failed before.

When we’ve been away from the gym for four months, we don’t want to do that first workout because we’re going to be last. It’s going to suck and we might get embarrassed.

SELF IMPOSED TAX

The Government makes us pay financial tax, but the other two – physical and mental – are self-imposed.

No one cares if you’re slow.

No one cares if you finish last.

No one cares if you blow your nutrition this week and have to start all over again.

You’d stop caring about what others thought about you if you realised how rarely they actually do.

Everyone thinks about themselves, mostly. That’s the tax they’re paying – and most of us overpay.

We’re taxed enough. Stop worrying about what you look like and start caring about what makes you feel good.

If you’d like to start taking steps in the right direction with your health and fitness, call in for a free consultation with us at Activate. Visit www.activate.ie/free-intro for more information.

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Tractor run raises €500 for charity

By Sean Moriarty Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019. 30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980. Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019.

30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980.

Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ on Lewis Road, the convoy travelled to the communications mast near Coolick in Kilcummin, where participants enjoyed views of the wider Castleisland district and Killarney Valley.

“Some of the drivers were never up there before and they were amazed with the views across the two valleys,” organiser Tom Leslie told the Killarney Advertiser.

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