Connect with us

News

Local Property Tax deadline is fast approaching

Published

on

0212849_shutterstock595777124.jpg

By Ted Healy of DNG TED HEALY

By now everyone will be aware that the Local Property Tax (LPT) return deadline is fast approaching on November 7.

.

So this week we give a quick easy to follow guide on the LPT; who is liable, how properties are assessed, what rates apply and how to pay.

Who Pays?

In essence, residential properties suitable for use as a dwelling (occupied or unoccupied) are subject to LPT. Certain properties were and continue to be exempt from the LPT, including properties unoccupied for an extended period by an ill or infirm liable person, or properties affected by pyrite or mica.

Some previous exemptions, such as new or unused properties purchased or built after 2013 or properties in unfinished housing estates, will no longer apply and now fall liable for LPT in 2022 and thereafter.
The owner of the residential property is legally liable for the LPT.

How is it Assessed?

The LPT is a value based tax and uses market values at its core. It is a self assessment tax with the onus on the property owner to value the property. It was first introduced in 2013 with property values set at market values in May of that year.

This year has seen a number of reforms of the system with the valuation bands largely increased and a revaluation date of November 1, 2021. The amount payable in 2021 will apply for the next four years, until 2025.

Revenue have issued a Notice of Estimate to each household which outlines an estimated liability. It is important to note that this is a guide only and liable persons are still required to value their property.

They can do so by using a number of different valuation sources or guides, including Revenue's online interactive valuation guide, the Residential Property Price Register, the use of a professional valuer, local real estate agents, or commercial property sales websites such as daft.ie or myhome.ie.

Once the taxpayer submits the valuation, Revenue’s estimated liability will be replaced by the self-assessed property valuation and the respective LPT charge.

Failure to submit a LPT return or the submission of an undervaluation may be subject to a penalty of €1,000 or a challenge by Revenue. At the same time, Revenue will pursue the estimated LPT liability amount using the available collection and enforcement options.

What is the rate?

The tax rate is set by central Government and was initially 0.18% for properties up to a value of €1m, with a higher rate of 0.25% levied on more valuable properties.

Given the increase in property prices and the inevitable rise in LPT liabilities, the Government has widened the valuation bands and reduced the lower rate (to 0.1029%, with the higher rates of 0.25% and 0.3%).

The following are the new valuation bands:

Local authorities have the power to vary the basic rate up or down by 15% annually. Kerry County Council have levied an additional 7.5% on top of the basic LPT rate.

Who collects the tax?

Revenue will continue to collect the LPT, and offer multiple payment options. These include a single payment using a debit card, credit card, cash or cheque; phased payments/instalments (monthly Direct Debit or via an approved Payment Service Provider such as An Post), or deduction at source (from salary/occupational pension/Government department).

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

Published

on

0244177_PATOSULLIVAN0577-Edit72.jpg

By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

Continue Reading

News

Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

Published

on

0244631_Blanket_2022.JPG

By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

Attachments

Continue Reading

LOCAL ADS

Last News

Advertisement

Sport

Trending