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Late Beaufort Garda fondly remembered by colleagues

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By Sean Moriarty

A popular member of An Garda Síochána, who passed away suddenly last year, was posthumously remembered by colleagues at the West Cork Garda Youth Awards.

Garda Aidan Cremin from Beaufort had attended St Brendan’s College in Killarney and worked in Moriarty's Photographic Store for many years before he became a Garda.

He was stationed in Castletownbere Haven in West Cork, where he served as the community Garda for the Adrigole area.

He had been living in West Cork for 13 years where he was a popular member of the tight-knit community, especially in GAA circles, where he was an active member of the local Adrigole Club.

He passed away in January 2021, aged just 47.

The West Cork Garda Youth Awards celebrate outstanding young people between the ages of 13 and 21 years, a project Aidan was immersed in through both his roles as a Community Garda and within Adrigole Club.

He was affectionately known as ‘The Sherriff’ to friends and colleagues, while in GAA circles he was known as ‘The Kingdom-Rebel’.

“His death has left a void and is still very raw in his adopted home. Aidan’s advice kept many the young person on the straight and narrow avoiding negative engagement with the Gardaí," Chief Superintendent Con Cadogan, Divisional Officer for Cork West Division, said.

"A testament to Aidan’s popularity in his adopted county was the huge crowds who on a miserable January night lined the Beara roads in the middle of the COVID-19 pandemic to pay their respects to Aidan Cremin a man whose legacy will never be forgotten."

The Posthumous Award was accepted by Aidan’s brother Mike, on behalf of the Cremin family.

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One way traffic system mooted for St Oliver’s National School

The Killarney Advertiser understands that a one-way traffic management system will be introduced at St Oliver’s National School. The plan remains subject to confirmation by Kerry County Council and other […]

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The Killarney Advertiser understands that a one-way traffic management system will be introduced at St Oliver’s National School.

The plan remains subject to confirmation by Kerry County Council and other statutory bodie. It is  understood that the system will be trialled at the beginning of the new school year in September.

The area is subject to serious traffic congestion during school drop-off and pick-up times every day.

Over 650 pupils and 80 staff attend the school every day. New housing developments in the area have added to traffic congestion.

Cllr Martin Grady has being pushing for enhanced road safety measures at the school since his co-option to the council in September 2023.

“The issue has worsened in recent years with Woodlawn, Rookery Road and Ballycasheen having more domestic property developments which brings with it more road activity,” Grady told the Killarney Advertiser.

“I’ve seen first-hand several accidents occur when dropping and collecting my children from the school. It needs a safe solution by means of a drop off- pick up point or a traffic management system put in place.

“It is unfair on all stakeholders involved. I will keep working on this until results are achieved in the interest of everyone’s safety. “

The lack of urban school bus services, not just at St Oliver’s but at all schools is adding to Killarney’s traffic woes.

“I would like to see school bus services return for all students, in both urban and rural schools, this service was a massive loss, it would greatly reduce the volume of traffic on our roads and mitigate the risk of accidents and near misses,” added Cllr Grady.

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Planning rules “nonsensical in a housing crisis” Cllr Healy-Rae

A planning rule which prevents people from building houses on their own land next to major roads is being challenged by Cllr Maura Healy Rae. The current planning policy states […]

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A planning rule which prevents people from building houses on their own land next to major roads is being challenged by Cllr Maura Healy Rae.

The current planning policy states that any application house along national primary and national secondary roadways exiting from existing entrances will not be considered.
Healy-Rae says this problem is particularly acute in the Killarney Municipal District given the amount of national roadway surrounding the area with the N22, N71 and N72.
“It is nonsensical that where an individual is living at home and using an existing entrance, can’t be considered to build their own house and use existing entrance they are already using,” she told the Killarney Advertiser.
“How Transport Infrastructure Ireland can quantify this as additional traffic is preposterous. Given we are in a housing crisis, given all the challenges surrounding planning, given exorbitant house prices and the lack of affordable housing, it is ludicrous that this is a reason people are being refused planning.”
She called on Kerry County Council to write to the TII, the Minister for Transport and the Minister for Local Government requesting that the current blanket policy be lifted.
“It [the policy] has directly resulted in numerous planning applications being refused and even considered at the pre-planning stage,” she added.
Kerry TD Danny Healy-Rae has also raised the issue in Dáil Éireann.

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