Connect with us

News

Know Your Rights: Gift Vouchers

Published

on

0217535_Citizens-Information_810_x_4560.jpg

Many people give and receive gift vouchers at Christmas. There are many benefits to gift vouchers but there are also some risks.

You may lose the voucher, it may expire before you can use it or you may not be able to spend the balance on a gift voucher. It is important that you know the conditions and rules that apply before you buy a gift voucher.

What are the current rules that apply to gift vouchers?

Since December 2, 2019, the Consumer Protection (Gift Vouchers) Act 2019 sets out new rules for gift vouchers.

These include the following:

Gift vouchers must have no expiry date or be valid for at least five years from the date the gift voucher is issued. You must be given details of the expiry date in a durable format (for example, on paper or by email) at the time you buy the gift voucher. Traders cannot specify that a gift voucher is spent in one transaction, and they cannot charge a fee to change the name on a gift voucher, (if you have to register a name on the voucher). If the balance remaining on a gift voucher is more than €1 after you buy something with it, a trader must reimburse the balance to you. They can give you cash, make an electronic transfer or give you another gift voucher.

Do these rules apply to gift vouchers purchased before December 2, 2019?

The legislation does not apply to gift vouchers bought before December 2, 2019. Some traders may be flexible. If your voucher has expired, you should contact the trader to see if they will extend it. However, if you bought the gift voucher before December 2, 2019, they have no legal obligation to do this and some may charge a fee.

What are my rights if I lose a voucher?

Gift vouchers are like cash, so if you lose them, the company does not have to replace them. If a voucher was made out to you specifically and is not transferable to anyone else, you may be able to get a replacement. This depends on the gift voucher’s terms and conditions and the company’s policy. If you lose a gift card, you may be able to get a replacement card but you need to check with the retailer. You could be charged a fee for the replacement card.

What happens if the shop goes out of business?

If a trader goes out of business before you use the voucher, you may have difficulty getting your money back. Usually the trader will owe money to several people so your claim is just one of many. There are rules for the priority to be given to the various debts owed in the case of the business going into liquidation or receivership. Generally, you will be low in the order of priority.

You will need to make a claim in writing to the appointed administrator or liquidator (if applicable) providing proof of your voucher. However, it is unlikely that your voucher will be honoured. If a new owner takes over, they do not have to honour your voucher.
For this reason, you should buy gift vouchers using a credit or debit card, as you may be able to use chargeback through your bank or credit card provider.
__________________________________________________________________________________________
During COVID-19, you can find comprehensive integrated information online at citizensinformation.ie/covid19/ and you can get daily updates on what’s changed on Twitter at @citizensinfo.

You can also get information and advice from:

Tralee on Tel: Call 0818 07 7860, Monday – Friday (10am-4pm)
The Citizens Information Phone Service: Call 0818 07 4000, Monday to Friday, 9am – 8pm

Our national call back service: Visit citizensinformation.ie/callback to request a phone call from an information officer

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

Published

on

0244177_PATOSULLIVAN0577-Edit72.jpg

By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

Continue Reading

News

Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

Published

on

0244631_Blanket_2022.JPG

By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

Attachments

Continue Reading

LOCAL ADS

Last News

Advertisement

Sport

Trending