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Killarney cyclists in dramatic photo finish

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By Sean Moriarty

Two Killarney cyclists were involved in a dramatic photo finish at Greenmount Races on Sunday last.

The event at Limerick Racecourse was organised by Greenmount Cycling Academy and attracted some of the best Munster-based riders across all classes.

The combined adult A1, A2, A3 and Junior race resulted in a race to the finish line between Killarney Cycling Club’s Stefan Caufield-Dreier and Cork-based Killarney racer Richard Maes who rides for VeloRevolution.

Caufield-Dreier is a former Under-16 National Time Trial champion and won the last year’s Junior Munster Time Trial title.

Maes is a former National A3 Road Racing champion and has been one of the most talented race cyclists to represent Killarney at national and international level.

However, it was the younger Caufield-Dreier who got the better of the more-experienced Maes at the finish line on Sunday.

“Killarney’s dominance ensures that the post-pandemic blues are well behind us with the spread of results being achieved in almost every category,” Killarney Cycling Club’s chairman Mark Murphy said.

“In what were humid conditions, the feature event of the day was the combined Senior and Junior race with Stefan Caulfied-Dreier taking the most narrow of victories to take the line, and in a very close third again was another Killarney man Lorcan Daly. Taking into account both are junior riders it bodes well for the future of road racing at the top table.”

Overall, it was a very successful weekend for Killarney Cycling Club with members taking no fewer than seven podiums. As well as Caufield-Dreier’s win, Lorcan Daly took third in the A1, A2, A3 and Junior race. Sam Bolger took third in the A4 race while there was underage success too.

Aaron O’Connor won the Under-12 race, Donagh O’Connor came out on top in the Under-15 race and Luke Costelloe won the Under-16 boys race. Shayna Daly took first place in the Girls Under-16 race.

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The tax you’re really paying for your health

By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?” In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word. We have it, and we use it, and, […]

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By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness

With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?”

In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word.

We have it, and we use it, and, of course we pay for it. We justify the constant ratcheting-up of our tax burden to pay for rising health-care costs. That tax is on our wallets.

We also pay another type of tax: When we’re unhealthy, we don’t get to do the things we like. When we’re overweight, we don’t always say “YES!” when our kids ask to go to the swimming pool.
When we’re unfit, we don’t take our buddy’s invitation for a weekend hiking and camping trip. We can’t start jogging because our knees hurt; can’t lift weights because our back hurts; can’t cut down calories because we feel we need the energy.

Those things are taxes. Physical taxes, but they’re not the worst taxes we pay.

The worst tax we pay is the mental tax.

When we’re self-conscious about our fitness or health, we don’t want to start exercising. We don’t want to look dumb or fail.

We don’t want to start a new lifestyle because our families will say “good for you”, because they know we need it, or they’ll say “you don’t need that …” and lie. Or they’ll roll their eyes because they know we’ve failed before.

When we’ve been away from the gym for four months, we don’t want to do that first workout because we’re going to be last. It’s going to suck and we might get embarrassed.

SELF IMPOSED TAX

The Government makes us pay financial tax, but the other two – physical and mental – are self-imposed.

No one cares if you’re slow.

No one cares if you finish last.

No one cares if you blow your nutrition this week and have to start all over again.

You’d stop caring about what others thought about you if you realised how rarely they actually do.

Everyone thinks about themselves, mostly. That’s the tax they’re paying – and most of us overpay.

We’re taxed enough. Stop worrying about what you look like and start caring about what makes you feel good.

If you’d like to start taking steps in the right direction with your health and fitness, call in for a free consultation with us at Activate. Visit www.activate.ie/free-intro for more information.

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Tractor run raises €500 for charity

By Sean Moriarty Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019. 30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980. Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019.

30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980.

Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ on Lewis Road, the convoy travelled to the communications mast near Coolick in Kilcummin, where participants enjoyed views of the wider Castleisland district and Killarney Valley.

“Some of the drivers were never up there before and they were amazed with the views across the two valleys,” organiser Tom Leslie told the Killarney Advertiser.

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