Connect with us

News

Inaugural Rhododendron conference is first in Ireland

Published

on

0214368_Meitheal_Volunteers_at_the_Blue_Pool1.jpg

The inaugural Rhododendron Conference on Friday, brought together landowners, farmers, community groups, individuals and environmentalists who have an interest in controlling and eradicating this invasive plant from the landscape.

Dr Therese Higgins Munster Technology University was one of the speakers at the Brehon conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum. Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

At the one-day conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum in the Brehon Hotel were from left: Dr. Therese Higgins (Munster Technology University) Eleanor Turner (Biosphere Officer Kerry UNESCO Biosphere Reserve South Kerry Development Partnership) Patricia Deane (Project Manager MacGillycuddy Reeks European Innovation Partnership Project South Kerry Development Partnership). Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

Eleanor Turner Biosphere Officer Kerry UNESCO Biosphere Reserve South Kerry Development Partnership pictured at the Brehon conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum. The conference was held in the Brehon Hotel Killarney. Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

Speakers at the one-day conference in the Brehon Hotel about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum were from left: Conference Moderator Aisling O'Brien Patricia Deane (Project Manager MacGillycuddy Reeks European Innovation Partnership Project South Kerry Development Partnership) and Danny O'Keeffe (Regional Conservation Ranger National Parks and Wildlife Services). Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

At the Brehon Hotel conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum were from left: Michéal McSweeney Eleanor Turner (Biosphere Officer Kerry UNESCO Biosphere Reserve South Kerry Development Partnership) and John McLoughlin. Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

At the one-day conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum originally planted in Muckross in the 19th Century were from left: Patricia Deane (Project Manager MacGillycuddy Reeks European Innovation Partnership Project South Kerry Development Partnership) Colin Heaslip (Dept of Agriculture) Eleanor Turner (Biosphere Officer Kerry UNESCO Biosphere Reserve South Kerry Development Partnership) and Mike O'Connell (Volunteer Killarney Meitheal Group). Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

At the one-day conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum were speakers from left: Claire Tangney (MTU Student and Volunteer) Padraig O'Donoghue (Meitheal Volunteer Group) Ger McEnery (Development Officer Reeks Forum South Kerry Development Partnership) and Sabine Graill (MTU Student). Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

At the one-day conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum were speakers and volunteers from left: Tim McEllistrim Tom Lyne and Mike O'Connell. Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

Patricia Deane Project Manager MacGillycuddy Reeks European Innovation Partnership Project South Kerry Development Partnership at the one day conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum in the Brehon Hotel Killarney. Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

Flor McCarthy Chairman Hill Farming Committee was one of the speakers at the Brehon conference about active management of the invasive Rhododendron Ponticum. Photo: Valerie O'Sullivan

Hosted by Kerry Biosphere at the Brehon Hotel, it was a well attended event with many concerned individuals from all parts of the country present. 

Rhododendron ponticum is a plant that originated in The Black Sea region of modern day Turkey called Pontus, hence the name ponticum. It was imported into Ireland and planted in Victorian Gardens by landlords of the time, and cherished for its rich showy floral displays of mauve each summer. It was also valued as cover for game which was important on many Victorian Estates as hunting was a popular pastime. This plant escaped these gardens and became established in the wild from around 1894. Since that time it has been encroaching on native flora and fauna and displacing all other plants and animals eventually.

"I was impressed by the interest and range of speakers at this the first Rhododendron Conference in Ireland and the first one to be hosted by The Kerry Biosphere," Diarmaid Griffin, Green Party LEA Representative who attended the conference, said.

"I have known about this invasive plant for many years but this conference is a milestone in the battle as it brought together all interested parties to share information and find a solution to this widespread problem."

MC on the day was Aisling O'Brien from Radio Kerry who presents Agritime with the station. Malcolm Noonan, Minister of Heritage spoke first and outlined his full commitment to the ongoing eradication programme and pledged funding for this in the NPWS budget.

Kerry Biosphere Officer Eleanor Turner spoke and gave a background to her work on promoting the conservation goals of this UNESCO designated site. Other speakers included Dr Therese Higgins of MTU who gave a comprehensive talk on the problem plant. 

Patricia Deane of the Macgillycuddy Reeks European Innovation Partnership Project outlined her work with hill farmers on improving the biodiversity and nature value of upland areas in Kerry.  

"Hill farmers in Kerry are doing great work with Tricia Deane in maintaining the biodiversity of our precious uplands. Not everyone might know how much these people are contributing to our environment and they deserve recognition and support. I hope this project continues long into the future," she said.

Flor McCarthy, a local hill farmer, spoke very well on his experience of the EIP Project. Like many hill farmers, he has an infestation of Rhododendron ponticum on his land and is one hundred percent behind its removal as it not only affects nature, but is also toxic to grazing sheep.

Seamie Hassettt spoke in the afternoon on the history of Killarney National Park's battle with the alien plant and new plans for the future. His talk was followed by a short film about The Killarney Mountain Meitheal and the great work they have done in removing Rhododendron from Killarney National Park.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

Killarney competitors bring home the medals

By Michelle Crean It was a great weekend for Killarney as Brazilian jiu jitsu competitors took home medals from the AJP Switzerland International Tour in Zurich. Members of Movement & Fitness Club competed against the world’s finest athletes which led to them bringing home amazing results.After a great fight Matthew Morris made it into the […]

Published

on

0216101_IMG-20211129-WA0019.jpg

By Michelle Crean

It was a great weekend for Killarney as Brazilian jiu jitsu competitors took home medals from the AJP Switzerland International Tour in Zurich.

Members of Movement & Fitness Club competed against the world’s finest athletes which led to them bringing home amazing results.After a great fight Matthew Morris made it into the semi-finals.Ewelina Downey received two gold medals in Gi and NOGI fights, just two months after her promotion to blue belt.The club’s coach, Wilson Da Silva, also competed for the first time as a brown belt, and won gold in the Gi category and silver in NOGI.”The results don’t lie,” he said.”The hard work, dedication, commitment and passion pays off. Impossible is nothing, and that’s what we are trying to teach our students in Movement & Fitness Club Killarney.”Martial Arts helps to fight depression, bulling, obesity, and builds up self esteem and confidence, he explained.”There is no ego, no one is better, we are all the same trying to learn from each other, helping and correcting ourselves so we become better together. Our club is filling up with amazing students from age four up who connect with us by the same passion and love for the sport. If you are looking to change your life come and join our family.”

Continue Reading

News

Ian makes his debut as a radio presenter

By Sean Moriarty Ian O’Connell said he is delighted with the messages of support following his first broadcast as a presenter on Radio Kerry this week. The well-known and popular Killarney man was left with life-changing injuries after falling from his bike in Killarney National Park in 2017. Since the accident he has been a […]

Published

on

0216300_20211115122334.jpg

By Sean Moriarty

Ian O’Connell said he is delighted with the messages of support following his first broadcast as a presenter on Radio Kerry this week.

The well-known and popular Killarney man was left with life-changing injuries after falling from his bike in Killarney National Park in 2017.

Since the accident he has been a champion for the less fortunate under his mantra: “If you can’t stand up – standout”.

This was the inspiration behind his brand new radio show which aired for the first time on Wednesday evening.

‘Stand Out with Ian O’Connell’ will feature interviews with people who have overcome great adversary to reach even greater heights.

His first guest was fellow Killarney man Jordan Lee. The Paralympian represented Ireland in the Tokyo Olympics this summer.

“I was used to being in the studio from people interviewing me, but this time I turned the table,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“It was great to have Jordan on, two Killarney men! I really enjoyed it, it got a massive reaction and I got loads of emails and messages afterwards and into Thursday morning.”

Ian will reveal his guest for the show on the previous Monday through various social media channels.

Attachments

Continue Reading

LOCAL ADS

Last News

Advertisement

Sport

Trending