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Flying doctor service to touch down in Killarney tomorrow morning

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IT WILL be a case of look to the skies in Killarney tomorrow morning when the Irish Community Air Ambulance (ICAA) arrives in town. The signature red craft will touch down in Fitzgerald Stadium at approximately 10.30am as part of a 10-day promotion organised by the ICAA as it introduces its Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS), a vital life-saving air support service to Munster and south Leinster, which takes off later this year.

The HEMS helicopter is a mobile intensive care unit staffed by a team of highly qualified and specially trained trauma doctors who can be on site in the fastest time possible providing life-saving treatment at the incident site. “It is an undisputed fact that in the aftermath of a major incident or accident timing is key and that outcomes are greatest when treatment can begin within the first hour, the ‘golden hour’,” stated the ICAA.

The Irish Community Air Ambulance service, which will be based out of Cork Airport, will mirror successful models across the United Kingdom and other countries in Europe where geographically challenging terrain warrants an air ambulance. It is hoped that more than €1million can be raised to launch the service in 2017. Irish Community Air Ambulance will complement the existing emergency services and the current Athlone based Emergency Aeromedical Service operated by the National Ambulance Service in partnership with the Irish Air Corps.

It has been proven that early access to world-class critical care and pre hospital emergency medicine administered by trained, experienced and equipped medical personnel can save lives. The air ambulance service will offer gold standard care commencing at the roadside and continuing while en route to definitive care in hospital.

Speaking of the service, John Kearney, co-founder of Irish Community Air Ambulance, said: "People are dying unnecessarily due to the time it takes to receive critical care. This new service will be built on the already successful model of Irish Community Rapid Response (ICRR) which has been in existence since 2009 and uses volunteer doctors for pre-hospital emergencies. There are currently five Level 4 clinicians and over 100 GPs with Irish Community Rapid Response who have saved countless lives and improved care in its nine years in operation. The launch of a community air ambulance service is the next step bringing better response times with permanent on-duty doctors who will have the ability to bring advanced skills to acutely ill and injured people throughout its catchment area.”

The service will offer a mobile intensive care unit by air which will allow the air ambulance to safely transport patients faster to a major hospital, saving time and lives. “This is a service for the Munster and south Leinster, and we need the support of the people to donate, fundraise or volunteer for us. We need to raise €1 million to take off and €2 million every year thereafter which is a huge ask but in our view is achievable,” said John.

“Communities around the country have sustained our land-based Irish Community Rapid Response doctors and now we’re calling on the people in Ireland to support this initiative. We can be successful by raising just €2 per person per year!

“This is a much needed and necessary service that will impact all those of us who live, work and travel in the coverage areas but it can only succeed with the support of every member of the community. This can be done by visiting our website (http://communityairambulance.ie/) and donating anything you can or by holding an event such as a coffee morning, a car wash or even a concert. We have a wide range of fundraising ideas and are happy to support them.”

John added: “If you’d like to help us lift off please text FLIGHT to 50300 to donate €4 to the Irish Community Air Ambulance.”

The Irish Community Air Ambulance team is traveling to every county in Munster and south Leinster over the next ten days to raise awareness of this much needed life saving service and will visit every town in the over the next six months in a bid to raise much needed funds.
 


 
On its way to Killarney: The Irish Community Air Ambulance. PICTURE: ICAA

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Free creative workshop for children impacted by cancer

Cancer support charity, Recovery Haven Kerry, will host a free creative workshop for children impacted by cancer this coming Thursday (September 30). The online event has been organised to mark Childhood Cancer Awareness Month this September and will be facilitated by Recovery Haven Kerry deputy manager and art therapist, Katie O’Donoghue from Killarney. The workshop, which […]

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Cancer support charity, Recovery Haven Kerry, will host a free creative workshop for children impacted by cancer this coming Thursday (September 30).

The online event has been organised to mark Childhood Cancer Awareness Month this September and will be facilitated by Recovery Haven Kerry deputy manager and art therapist, Katie O’Donoghue from Killarney.

The workshop, which takes place via Zoom at 6.30pm, is aimed at children who have been impacted by cancer in any way and will also see Katie read from her debut children’s book, ‘‘The Little Squirrel Who Worried’.

Workshop facilitator, Katie, has worked for many years as a child and young people’s therapist with the NHS, before returning to her native Killarney this year. Her background is in fine art and design and she has a Masters degree in Art Psychotherapy.

If you would like to register your child for this free online workshop, please contact Recovery Haven Kerry on 066 7192122 to book your place.

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Not to be for Killarney as Waterford named Best Place to Live in Ireland

While Killarney made it through to the last five, in the end it was Waterford City which claimed the overall title of Best Place to Live in Ireland 2021. While the city was the unanimous choice of the judging panel it had to beat off stiff competition from Killarney and three other shortlisted locations: Clonakilty, […]

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While Killarney made it through to the last five, in the end it was Waterford City which claimed the overall title of Best Place to Live in Ireland 2021.

While the city was the unanimous choice of the judging panel it had to beat off stiff competition from Killarney and three other shortlisted locations: Clonakilty, Co Cork, Galway city and the village of Glaslough in Co Monaghan.

Among the things which impressed the judges about Waterford were its beautiful buildings, its liveability, its pedestrian friendly public space, its weather, and its easy access to the Comeragh Mountains and the Copper Coast.

The Chair of the judging panel Conor Goodman congratulated Killarney on its fine showing in the competition.

“Given the level of entries and the extremely high standard of those entries, making it into the Best 5 Places to Live in Ireland really is a wonderful achievement which I’m sure everyone in Killarney and Kerry is really proud of. We were delighted with the level of interest in the competition and would like to thank everyone who nominated a place or who engaged with us on it.”

The Irish Times Best Place to Live in Ireland contest, which is supported by Randox Health, began in June.

In total 470 locations were nominated by more than 2,400 people from all 32 counties for the title of ‘Best Place to Live in Ireland 2021’.

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