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Féile Lughnasadh  Milltown, built on tradition

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Féile Lughnasadh will take place in Milltown from July 28 to 31, and marks a very important time in the life of ancient Ireland.

FESTIVAL: Sharon Shannon will headline Féile Lughnasadh in Milltown on Saturday July 30

The festival, featuring Sharon Shannon, jiggy and The Rising playing free, open-air concerts, will be a spectacular celebration of tradition and culture for all the family.

Féile Lughnasadh is based on the late July celebration of the beginning of the annual harvest and the origins of this reach back into the mists of Celtic lore. The Celtic god Lugh is honoured in many parts of the Celtic world, throughout Ireland and Europe. County Louth and the Galician city of Lugo in Spain both derive their names from this Celtic past.

Traditions including Garland Sunday and Lammastide also owe their origins to honouring Lugh, the protector of the people and provider of the rich harvest of food, sustaining all for the long winter ahead. Legend tells us that Lugh defeated Crom Dubh and freed the people from darkness and hunger.

The end of July in ancient times would see nuts and berries ripen, before the main crops of grain and roots later in the year. People celebrated nature’s abundance and hoped the gods would ensure a dry autumn and a good harvest. Lugh and his foster mother, Tailtiu, are the Celtic figures most associated with this festival. Tailtiu gives her name to the Tailteann games, a term used for several events, most recently in the football championships.

Lughnasadh is a key event in the Celtic year, marking the half-way point between the summer solstice on June 21st and the autumn equinox on September 21.

“It’s fitting to name our festival after a god who protects the people and provides for their needs. Our festival comes at a time where we need to get out and celebrate our cherished traditions again”, said organiser Owen O’Shea.

"The ancient origins of the festival will be marked with the opening parade on July 28th, with local groups in costume as Lugh and Tailtiu, wearing traditional straw and rush garments in what promises to be a spectacular opening. “We’ve worked with local groups, using traditional methods to recreate Celtic ceremonial clothes making for a rich, authentic experience.”

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30 years of Innisfallen Island MassThe annual special concelebrated Mass on Innisfallen Island takes place next week.

Next Friday (June 21), members of the public are invited to attend the Mass taking place at 6.30pm. Now in its 30th year, the Mass was originally an idea by […]

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Next Friday (June 21), members of the public are invited to attend the Mass taking place at 6.30pm.

Now in its 30th year, the Mass was originally an idea by Geoffrey O’Donoghue who sadly died four years after it began.

“There was an Augustinian Monastery on Innisfallen Island and the people, including priests and monks and they say Brian Boro, went out there to study. The lake, Lough Lein is called ‘The Lake of Learning’,” said his wife Mary who carries on the tradition in his memory.

“My husband Geoffrey was a descendent of the O’Donoghues and he wanted to have Mass on the island. The O’Donoghues built Ross Castle and owned the lands and the lake surrounding it which was later donated by John McShane to the people of Killarney. He [Geoffrey] asked one of the friars and one day he got a call from the OPW that there would be a plaque unveiled to John McShane and they asked if the Mass could coincide with it. It was attended by Sr Pauline, John McShane’s daughter.”

She added that all the public are welcome to attend. Boats, which will have a nominal fee to cover their costs, will be carrying passengers out from 4pm onwards.

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Photo of “hidden gem” wins Camera Club’s latest competition

A photograph of one of Killarney’s hidden beauty spots was deemed the winner of Killarney Camera Club’s most recent competition. Th standard was high throughout all categories but in the […]

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A photograph of one of Killarney’s hidden beauty spots was deemed the winner of Killarney Camera Club’s most recent competition.

Th standard was high throughout all categories but in the Novice category, Iryna Halaieva’s photograph of O’Sullivan’s Cascade was deemed the winner.

“A waterfall is my favourite waterbody and long exposure is my favourite photographic technique,” she said. “I do my best to have as many waterfalls as possible in my photo collection. I heard a lot about O’Sullivan’s Cascade and wanted to visit that hidden gem of Kerry. So, shortly before our club competition I went with a friend to Tomies Wood to photograph it. It was a dream come true for me.”

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