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There’s plenty of jobs to do in the garden

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By Debby Looney, gardening expert

It seems that the longer the days get, the bigger the list of jobs in the garden gets!

Everything, including weeds, is experiencing a growth spurt. While, in principle, I am against using pesticides and herbicides, sometimes exceptions can be made for example, the gravel drive! There are a few products available which prevent regrowth, Weedol ‘Pathclear’, ‘Premazor’ and Resolva granular ‘Weed preventer’, all have enzymes which prevent seeds from germinating, giving you at least six months control.

Conifers always look their best at this time of year, especially those with brightly coloured shoots such as Picea 'Daisy’s White'. Top of the list, for me, has to be Abies koreana, a beautifully shaped conifer, with bright green new growth and bright purpley-blue cones. It is a slow grower and suitable for medium sized gardens as a specimen. Herbaceous plants are all making an appearance, and Candelabra Primulas are spectacular now, with their tall spikes of multi-coloured flowers. They grow particularly well in moist shady areas of the garden, and they are slug resistant.

For some weeks now bedding plants have been available, but to my mind it has been too early to plant them out. However, with the month turning and the weather heating up, it is safe enough to start planting out the bedding. Do keep an eye on the weather forecast and cover any annuals with garden fleece, or even some hessian.

Planting pots

There is a fantastic range of pots available to the gardener, ranging from enormous glazed pots, to very affordable high quality plastic ones. My favourites are still the basic terracotta pot, as I love the way they age. There are pots to suit every situation, from square fibreglass ones in which topiary looks stunning to brightly coloured stackable pots. When planting pots, we have always been told to put some drainage in the bottom, such as gravel. This works quite well, but the new way of thinking is to omit any drainage. When water draining through the pot suddenly finds itself with nothing to cling to, that is, when it hits the “drainage”, it actually stops moving downward, and in a bizarre way causes waterlogging! So, save yourself the trouble, and put your compost straight in! Mix in some water retaining gel, and slow release fertiliser, then water the pot before planting. The gel will swell so you can gauge whether you have put in enough compost. As a rule of thumb, I find three patio plants such as surfinias or bacopas, in a 14 inch basket is plenty. Fill in any gaps with trailing lobelia, or other bedding in trays. If you put too much into a basket or pot, the result will be some of the plants dying due to lack of space!

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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