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Endurance was first ship in history to be insured

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By John Healy of Healy Insurances

The Endurance, the lost vessel of Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton and Annascaul native Tom Crean, was found at the bottom of the Weddell Sea on March 5 last.

Photo: Falklands Maritime Heritage Trust

The ship was crushed by Antarctic sea-ice in January 1915 and sank on November 21 1915, forcing Shackleton and his crew to make their escape on foot and in small boats. The rescue mission took four attempts with the remainder of the 28 crew rescued from Elephant Island on August 30 1916. It had been 24 months and 22 days since they set sail from England. It's considered to be one of the great survival stories of human history.

Paul Miller of The Insurance Museum in London confirmed that the Endurance was insured at Lloyds of London in 1914. News that the Endurance was missing first came via Lloyds “apart from the natural anxiety as to the fate of Ernest Shackleton, underwriters are now somewhat concerned about the safety of the expedition ship Endurance which has not been heard of since she left South Georgia in December 1914 to carry the transatlantic party to their starting point”.

Lloyd’s and the Indemnity Marine Assurance Company had underwritten its hull, machinery and equipment for £15,000.

This was the first vessel to take part in Antarctic exploration to be covered against all risks throughout her voyage.

It had appeared to be a good risk as there had been no record of recent disaster to an Antarctic ship. Over the previous 20 years, 23 vessels had gone and returned home safely.

The Endurance was the first ship in history to be insured into the waters of the Antarctic. The Times reported "Hitherto the insurance of vessels taking part in Antarctic exploration has ceased at the last port touched, and Endurance will be the first vessel to be insured in the ice zone".

The scientists aboard the research vessel that located the Endurance said that the wreck was in remarkably good condition with the name Endurance on the stern still clearly legible.

The scientists did not salvage any part of the wreck as the ship is now a protected historic site and monument under the Antarctic treaty system, the international regulations that apply to Antarctica.

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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