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Eight weeks for this? It’s an absolute disgrace

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Football fans across the country were rightly abhorred by the incident in last Sunday’s Kerry SFC semi-final which left East Kerry youngster Dara Moynihan laid out on the floor.

Video footage clearly shows Dingle selector Colm Geaney rushing onto the field to punch Moynihan in the face. Observers the length and breadth of the country called for a lengthy ban (if not a lifetime ban) but, incredibly, the county board have handed out an eight-week suspension.

It’s an absolute disgrace.

What kind of message are the GAA sending out here? In March, a Clare footballer squirted water in the general direction of an umpire. He was banned for three months. I know a lad who was incorrectly told by his Australian club that his suspension from a 7-a-side tournament didn’t carry over to their league competition. He played in the league and got a six-month worldwide ban. And a mentor entering the field of play to physically assault a player gets eight weeks?

Geaney will miss the county final on Sunday, which Dingle are expected to lose, and he’ll be back on the line for the start of next season.

There has been a lot of player-on-player violence recently but, as public reaction to this particular incident has shown, there is something particularly egregious about someone entering the field to attack a player.

On-pitch fighting isn’t something that I’d condone but you have to give some leeway to the guys who are actually out there. It’s a physical game and everyone is desperate to win. Things get heated – it’s simply bound to boil over every now and then. You accept that as a player and unless it’s an especially aggressive or sneaky assault, guys rarely even hold a grudge. It’s water under the bridge.

But a non-player, who has no business whatsoever on the field of play, simply cannot do what Geaney did on Sunday. It’s assault, in my opinion, and should be treated as such. The old “If you did it on the street…” argument doesn’t always hold up but in this instance I think it does. If someone did the same thing outside the chipper the night before he’d end up in court. If a supporter ran onto the field and did it he’d be in serious trouble. Why should a selector get away with a slap on the wrist?

As far as I’m concerned, the pitch should be for players and players alone. You see managers and selectors roaming the sidelines and encroaching 5-10 yards onto the field of play, sometimes more. As a player I find it so annoying. Mentors run across the width of the field to have a quick chat with a player, often while the ball is in play. I’m convinced there’s no need for it half the time.

To be honest, I think some mentors get a bit of a buzz out of it. They want to feel like they’re part of the action and they want people up in the terrace to see how integral they are to the operation. In reality, the instructions you get from the sideline are rarely insightful. The gist is generally, “Don’t do that bad thing you just did. Do something good instead.”

Got it. Sound.

If managers really need to pass on information to their players, maybe a runner system like the one in the AFL would be a… runner? Allow two designated members of the backroom team to enter the field at an appropriate juncture, speak to players and leave in a timely fashion. If they fail to adhere to the rules, say for instance they address or approach an opposition player, they get sent off and the team forfeits their right to deploy a runner for the rest of the game.

And the runners could double as maoir uisce as well. Some clubs are giving bottles to any Joe Soap on the basis that “He’s just a water boy” but, when it comes down to it, you’re basically giving unqualified people free reign to enter the field whenever they deem fit.

I think technical areas like the ones in soccer would be a good idea too. Some GAA managers would have a hard time adapting but so be it. At the end of the day, player safety has to be paramount and as last Sunday’s incident shows, some non-players actually need to be penned in.

Flash point

When things do get tetchy, managers/selectors/maoir uisce entering the field of play can be more than annoying; it can be downright infuriating.

Players square up all the time but 99 times of out of 100, no punches are thrown. Even when a punch is thrown, the flare-up almost always resolves itself relatively quickly. The intervention of a mentor, or a maor uisce, or even a sub – even if his intentions are good – invariably has an aggravating effect rather than a calming one. If you’re playing your immediate reaction is, “Get off the f***ing pitch”.

Look, I wasn’t down there on the line the last day. The culprit may feel as though he can somehow justify what happened. Maybe words were exchanged.

But, funnily enough, with players from both sides piling into the melee, Dara actually made the decision not to take part. He may have been worried about getting sent off and so did the smart thing by keeping his distance. And he still ended up getting attacked.

The GAA have to get serious with their punishments when incidents like this happen. The way things are going, it’s only a matter of time before someone gets seriously hurt. Or worse.

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Who’s in your circle?

    Are you happy and where you want to be with your health, where you want to be financially or are you going through the motions each day, unsure of your purpose? Are you supported by others when you’re struggling or only supported by others when things are going well?Are you looking forward to […]

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Are you happy and where you want to be with your health, where you want to be financially or are you going through the motions each day, unsure of your purpose?

Are you supported by others when you’re struggling or only supported by others when things are going well?
Are you looking forward to the next five, 10, 20 years of your life?

If you answered “no” to any of these questions, I encourage you to look around at the people you spend your time with. Your time is your most expensive asset. Your mind is your most expensive real estate.

With whom you spend your time, and those that you permit to impact your thoughts and decisions will have a great impact on your life.

From the outside looking in, our gym culture is the most difficult health benefit for others to understand.
Now more than ever all our brains are fed is chaos, division, selfishness and negativity. We can’t have that here. Those that thrive in that environment aren’t a good fit for us, and they won’t last long here. Either they’ll leave on their own, or we’ll tell them it’s time to go.

Years ago, when I was struggling with some people decisions (personally and business); one of my mentors told me something that continues to stick with me. It’s since been something I have said to people many times;
“The people that have helped you get to where you are may not be the same people that can help you get to where you want to go.”

Ask yourself these three questions;

* Who’s in your circle?
* Who do you need to start spending less time with?
* In order to get where you want to be, what kind of people do you need to start spending more of your time with?

Now it’s time to get to work. Start spending less time with those dragging you down. Start surrounding yourself with the people that won’t condone your behaviours that aren’t consistent with your goals, support your work ethic, help you to learn from your failures and will be excited to celebrate your successes.

When you are ready, we are here to help. Book your complimentary consultation by visiting our website www.activate.ie.

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Get on your bike from The Rose Hotel!

  There’s an energetic way to explore Tralee and its surrounds this summer as a new bike rental company has teamed up with The Rose Hotel. Tralee Bike Rental have opened a new bike kiosk located at the hotel where visitors and locals can now hire a bike. “This is a fantastic service for our […]

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There’s an energetic way to explore Tralee and its surrounds this summer as a new bike rental company has teamed up with The Rose Hotel.

Tralee Bike Rental have opened a new bike kiosk located at the hotel where visitors and locals can now hire a bike.

“This is a fantastic service for our customers and we are thrilled to be part of this new collaboration with Tralee Bike Rental. We wish Maurice and his team the very best of luck, and I know all our guests and visitors to Tralee are going to really enjoy this new service exploring Tralee and its surrounds,” Mark Sullivan, General Manager, The Rose Hotel, said.

Tralee Bike Rental have a fleet of comfortable, top quality Hybrid Bikes – ideal for a leisurely cycle, and power assisted eBikes. For families, child seats or trailer for the little legs that can’t cycle yet can be provided!

“We are thrilled to have our new business, Tralee Bike Rental, located on the grounds of The Rose Hotel,” Maurice Whelan, Tralee Bike Rental, said.

“With so many visitors coming to Tralee, we feel this will be a fantastic service and partnership. Included in the bike rental is access to a self-guided tour via our App, which has preloaded moderate and more energetic cycling tours of Tralee.”

The Rose Hotel have a new package, Tralee Activity Break, with bike hire included. You can book this package online at www.therosehotel.com or call 066 7199100.

To contact Tralee Bike Rental, visit www.traleebikerental.ie or call 085 2605817.

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Currow kids go toddling to raise vital funds

  70 toddlers from Currow Play School have become Ireland’s littlest fundraisers as they stepped out to raise vital funds for vulnerable children. They took part in the Barnardos Big Toddle which this year has the theme of ’Community Helpers’. Barnardos currently works with just under 18,000 children and families across Ireland and the funds raised will support Barnardos Early Years […]

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70 toddlers from Currow Play School have become Ireland’s littlest fundraisers as they stepped out to raise vital funds for vulnerable children.

They took part in the Barnardos Big Toddle which this year has the theme of ’Community Helpers’.

Barnardos currently works with just under 18,000 children and families across Ireland and the funds raised will support Barnardos Early Years services.

“This year, Currow Play School turns 25 and we have been taking part in Barnardos Big Toddle since 2006, which is 18 years of toddling in aid of vulnerable children,” Catherine Fleming form Currow Play School said.
“Our toddle is a highlight for the children and the team every year. It’s fantastic to get the little ones involved in something so worthwhile at a young age, it’s always a great day of fun. Barnardos provides a huge number of services in communities across Ireland, but these can only continue with help from the public. The toddle runs throughout June so I would implore anyone with toddlers or wobblers at home to sign up for Barnardos Big Toddle supported by Pipin Pear today.”

Anyone wishing to take part can register today at www.barnardos.ie/bigtoddle.  

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