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Council launches annual report

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By Michelle Crean

Kerry County Council published its annual report for 2018, which was launched at County Buildings last week by Cathaoirleach of Kerry County Council, Cllr Niall Kelleher.

The report is a comprehensive record of the work and achievements of the local authority during last year and sets out the infrastructural improvements, service delivery and investment in projects and initiatives achieved in the year against the backdrop of a €225m spend in capital and revenue expenditure.

During 2018, there was significant investment in essential infrastructure including, for example, an increased investment of €53m in the county’s roads network, the continuing rollout of a €62m housing programme, and the opening of a new €30m water treatment plant at Lough Guitane which provides clean drinking water to approximately half of the population of the county, as well as the many visitors to Kerry.

For the Killarney area, capital projects during this time included the opening of a new burial ground in Knockeendubh, providing approximately 2,300 burial spaces for the next 30 years.

The Flesk Cycle/Walkway received Part 8 Planning approval in 2018 and the recently opened Rock Road car park provided an additional 190 parking spaces in the town.

The Municipal District was also successful in obtaining funding under the Urban Regeneration Development Fund towards the development of a masterplan for the Áras Phádraig site. A project team was put in place to proceed with the development of a masterplan for this site on Lewis Road.

Work also continued on proposals to further develop the walking route from the Gap Cross to the Gap of Dunloe and around Lough Leane.

Part 8 approval for the redevelopment of the Cultural Centre on East Avenue Road which involves significant refurbishment and accessibility works inside the building along with development of an outdoor area for events, was progressed in 2018.

Infrastructural developments include the N71 Port Road was strengthened and overlaid in 2018. The scheme also involved safety improvement works at the junction of the Port Road and New Road, as well as the upgrading and relocating the existing pedestrian crossing on the Port Road. This allows improved access to the Knockeer Children’s Playground and Killarney National Park.

Resurfacing of Kenmare Place and the ‘HaHah’ took place as well as sections of Main Street and Mission Road. The upgrade of the Fair Hill pedestrian crossing received Section 38 approval in November.

Kerry County Council also invested in over €200,000 for street cleaning equipment including the purchase of a new road sweeper.

Also, Killarney Municipal District staff in conjunction with volunteers from Killarney Looking Good planted 26,000 spring bulbs at locations along the Mission Road, Dr Hans Liebherr Road and the Killarney Bypass.

Several areas within the Municipal District received CLÁR funding for local and community projects including Firies, Rathmore and Barraduff.

75 projects were approved for funding under the Community Support Fund with a monetary value of €175,000.

“As Chief Excutive of the Council, I wish to sincerely thank the staff of the organisation – those based in Áras An Chontae, our Municipal District offices, our local Area Offices and our outdoor staff in every part of the county,” Chief Executive of Kerry County Council, Moira Murrell said. “Their dedication and professionalism exemplify the important public service provided by the local authority.”

 

 

 

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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