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Chamber statement on traffic

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Killarney Chamber of Tourism and Commerce has real concerns about the unacceptable delay in implementing a proper and practical traffic management system in and around Killarney.

We welcome recent concerns expressed by the elected members regarding the town not being adequately prepared or best positioned to cope with demand in terms of required traffic flow, parking requirements and congestion issues. Almost two years since Killarney Municipal District Council took delivery of a traffic management review, it is a significant worry that the gridlock experienced in the summer of 2018, by locals and visitors, was unprecedented.

While Chamber acknowledges the efforts of the elected members and management of Killarney Municipal District Council, it would appear that progress is being hindered by the absence of a clear parking management strategy and the recommendations of the report not being implemented. Killarney Chamber, has, in its meetings with the Killarney Municipal District management, since 2015, continually highlighted the traffic management issue as the top priority for our members.

This year Killarney Chamber carried out a TEIR One (Tourism Economic Impact Report), which projected a conservative 3% growth over the next decade. There is a clear and present threat that the Killarney brand will be significantly damaged if the local authority does not act, as a matter of priority, to solve the town’s traffic problems and implement the main findings of the traffic management review.

Killarney Chamber of Tourism and Commerce, a representative body of 200 local businesses, accepts that there is no silver bullet solution to the gridlock but there is absolutely no doubt that some proposed short to medium-term measures can be put in place to help tackle the problems being experienced. There seems to have been little or no progress on short-term remedies such as the proposed inner relief road at St Mary's Terrace/Monsignor Hugh O'Flaherty Road, the development Rock Road car park or the relief road at Deerpark.

Given the ordeal endured by motorists this summer, it was quite alarming to hear senior local authority officials indicate that the reality is it will be a minimum of 10 to 12 years before the gridlock in the town can be adequately tackled when – or if – an outer relief road is approved.

It is quite clear that greater expediency is required, that a new parking strategy must be implemented as a matter of extreme urgency and that facilities for parking are provided as an immediate priority.

Killarney Chamber of Tourism and Commerce is managing growth in the tourism sector through proper forward planning and analysis and the hope now is that Killarney Municipal District Council can do likewise in terms of traffic management. Chamber is willing and able to play its part and to engage fully in the process but a firm commitment is now required on the part of Kerry County Council.

The growth of the entire county of Kerry depends on Killarney, as the premier tourist destination, continuing to prosper but it will be unable to do so without adequate traffic management. This is essential in order to future proof Killarney as one of Ireland's top visitor destinations.

Killarney Chamber of Tourism and Commerce

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30 years of Innisfallen Island MassThe annual special concelebrated Mass on Innisfallen Island takes place next week.

Next Friday (June 21), members of the public are invited to attend the Mass taking place at 6.30pm. Now in its 30th year, the Mass was originally an idea by […]

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Next Friday (June 21), members of the public are invited to attend the Mass taking place at 6.30pm.

Now in its 30th year, the Mass was originally an idea by Geoffrey O’Donoghue who sadly died four years after it began.

“There was an Augustinian Monastery on Innisfallen Island and the people, including priests and monks and they say Brian Boro, went out there to study. The lake, Lough Lein is called ‘The Lake of Learning’,” said his wife Mary who carries on the tradition in his memory.

“My husband Geoffrey was a descendent of the O’Donoghues and he wanted to have Mass on the island. The O’Donoghues built Ross Castle and owned the lands and the lake surrounding it which was later donated by John McShane to the people of Killarney. He [Geoffrey] asked one of the friars and one day he got a call from the OPW that there would be a plaque unveiled to John McShane and they asked if the Mass could coincide with it. It was attended by Sr Pauline, John McShane’s daughter.”

She added that all the public are welcome to attend. Boats, which will have a nominal fee to cover their costs, will be carrying passengers out from 4pm onwards.

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Photo of “hidden gem” wins Camera Club’s latest competition

A photograph of one of Killarney’s hidden beauty spots was deemed the winner of Killarney Camera Club’s most recent competition. Th standard was high throughout all categories but in the […]

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A photograph of one of Killarney’s hidden beauty spots was deemed the winner of Killarney Camera Club’s most recent competition.

Th standard was high throughout all categories but in the Novice category, Iryna Halaieva’s photograph of O’Sullivan’s Cascade was deemed the winner.

“A waterfall is my favourite waterbody and long exposure is my favourite photographic technique,” she said. “I do my best to have as many waterfalls as possible in my photo collection. I heard a lot about O’Sullivan’s Cascade and wanted to visit that hidden gem of Kerry. So, shortly before our club competition I went with a friend to Tomies Wood to photograph it. It was a dream come true for me.”

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