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Cancer fundraiser set up in memory of popular Killarney man

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FUNDRAISER: Derry O'Leary wanted to thank care staff who looked after him while he fought cancer so a fundraiser was set up in his memory.

By Sean Moriarty

A GoFundMe campaign set up in memory of a popular Killarney man has already raised €8,000 for cancer charities in the county.

Derry (Jeremiah) O'Leary, from Flesk Bridge House, Muckross Road, and formerly of Inch, Kilcummin, passed away on Easter Saturday after a long fight with the disease.

Derry was so thankful for the care he received in the Palliative Day Care and Palliative Care Hospice at University Hospital Kerry and the support from the Irish Cancer Society Daffodil Nurses that it was one of his last wishes a fundraiser for these charities should be set up in his name after he passed.

He was well-known around Killarney having worked in a variety of roles with companies including Transmould, Dawn Dairies and finally Stryker Medical in Macroom.

An avid Liverpool fan he had travelled many times to Anfield to see his beloved Reds play. Derry also travelled to many race meetings across the country and abroad with Cheltenham being one of his favourites.

Indeed, it was at the Killarney Races where he first met his wife Helen Mannix, and later ended up proposing at the Galway Festival which became a yearly celebration for them.

Helen said she was thrilled with the response to the fundraiser.

“This is what he wanted, and I wanted to do it sooner rather than later," she told the Killarney Advertiser.

"He was very grateful to the staff at the three charities and would even look forward to his trip to University Hospital Kerry every Wednesday as his day out – they were so good."

Derry was an accomplished sportsman too and played for the Kilcummin GAA side that won the 1997 Intermediate Football Championship with his father Jerry as selector. He was also a keen soccer player with Anabla FC and Mastergeeha, and was a member of the 1994 St Brendan’s College team that won the Corn Uí Mhuirí.

His cousin Sean O’Leary also played for Kilcummin in 1997.

“Derry was a major part in us winning," he said.

"Derry got bad news over two years ago and faced his illness like every battle he faced on the field with determination and courage. May the sod lay lightly on Derry, my old teammate, cousin and loyal friend.”

To donate, go to GoFundMe: Derry O Leary Memorial Fund.

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The tax you’re really paying for your health

By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?” In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word. We have it, and we use it, and, […]

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By Brian Foley from Activate Fitness

With the budget just squared away, there’s always an air of “how did I do out of it?”

In Ireland, we enjoy a public healthcare system which is touted to become a universal healthcare system. Maybe “enjoy” is the wrong word.

We have it, and we use it, and, of course we pay for it. We justify the constant ratcheting-up of our tax burden to pay for rising health-care costs. That tax is on our wallets.

We also pay another type of tax: When we’re unhealthy, we don’t get to do the things we like. When we’re overweight, we don’t always say “YES!” when our kids ask to go to the swimming pool.
When we’re unfit, we don’t take our buddy’s invitation for a weekend hiking and camping trip. We can’t start jogging because our knees hurt; can’t lift weights because our back hurts; can’t cut down calories because we feel we need the energy.

Those things are taxes. Physical taxes, but they’re not the worst taxes we pay.

The worst tax we pay is the mental tax.

When we’re self-conscious about our fitness or health, we don’t want to start exercising. We don’t want to look dumb or fail.

We don’t want to start a new lifestyle because our families will say “good for you”, because they know we need it, or they’ll say “you don’t need that …” and lie. Or they’ll roll their eyes because they know we’ve failed before.

When we’ve been away from the gym for four months, we don’t want to do that first workout because we’re going to be last. It’s going to suck and we might get embarrassed.

SELF IMPOSED TAX

The Government makes us pay financial tax, but the other two – physical and mental – are self-imposed.

No one cares if you’re slow.

No one cares if you finish last.

No one cares if you blow your nutrition this week and have to start all over again.

You’d stop caring about what others thought about you if you realised how rarely they actually do.

Everyone thinks about themselves, mostly. That’s the tax they’re paying – and most of us overpay.

We’re taxed enough. Stop worrying about what you look like and start caring about what makes you feel good.

If you’d like to start taking steps in the right direction with your health and fitness, call in for a free consultation with us at Activate. Visit www.activate.ie/free-intro for more information.

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Tractor run raises €500 for charity

By Sean Moriarty Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019. 30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980. Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Members of Killarney Valley Vintage and Classic Club raised €500 for the Kerry Mental Health Association during their first tractor run since April 2019.

30 tractors took part on Sunday including two rare Ford 3000s from 1974 and an even rarer Zetor Crystal from 1980.

Departing from the club’s new ‘Vintage Shed’ on Lewis Road, the convoy travelled to the communications mast near Coolick in Kilcummin, where participants enjoyed views of the wider Castleisland district and Killarney Valley.

“Some of the drivers were never up there before and they were amazed with the views across the two valleys,” organiser Tom Leslie told the Killarney Advertiser.

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