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Talented Andrew has all the ‘write’ stuff

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Andrew Quinlivan, St Brendan’s College, centre, is awarded third place in the NewsBrands Ireland Press Pass Awards Sports category, pictured with Brian McCrory, president of Irish League of Credit Unions, Claire O’Sullivan, member of the judging panel. Vincent Crowley, chairman, NewsBrands Ireland, and Minister Damien English.

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Andrew Quinlivan, St Brendan’s College, centre, is awarded third place in the NewsBrands Ireland Press Pass Awards Sports category, pictured with Brian McCrory, president of Irish League of Credit Unions, Claire O’Sullivan, member of the judging panel. Vincent Crowley, chairman, NewsBrands Ireland, and Minister Damien English.
 


 
THE average Premier League footballer in England earns in a week what a doctor working for the National Health Service there earns in a year. The great Premier League stars can earn double and sometimes treble a doctor’s salary in the same time period. These are just two of the facts that emerge from talented Killarney student Andrew Quinlivan’s critique of the beautiful game.
Andrew, a transition year student from St Brendan’s College, achieved third place in the Sports category of the prestigious Press Pass awards.
Praising his entry, the judges noted: “He tells us that doctors save lives whereas footballers can save us from boredom - and don’t always succeed. Andrew’s work is as cutting as a good striker should be and well worthy of this recognition.”
Andrew received his award from the Minister for Skills, Research and Innovation, Damien English TD, last week at a ceremony in the Convention Centre in Dublin.
Press Pass is a transition-year initiative that focuses on newspapers in education.
“A specially created workbook goes out to all participating schools around Ireland in November each year and then we deliver newspapers free of charge over a two-week period. We had 7,500 students take part this year,” said spokeswoman Anne-Marie Lenihan.
“The students then prepare entries for the journalism competition in four written categories (news, features, opinion and sport) and a photojournalism category. The schools put forward the best three to the national competition which is judged by a panel of journalists and editors from NewsBrands titles, chaired by Professor John Horgan.”
Below you can read Andrew Quinlivan’s prizewinning entry:

THE PRICE OF PLAYING SOCCER

By Andrew Quinlivan

AS I type this, West Ham’s Andy Carroll has been ruled out of playing soccer for up to six weeks with a hamstring injury. And by the end of February, Andy will have earned himself almost half a million pounds for...oh, yeah, not doing his job.
It’s a regular occurrence these days that soccer players are offered lucrative contracts, and it’s also a regular occurrence for them to get injured. While many of these players stay fit and try to dazzle us with their feet, one thing is for certain: their piggy bank will be heavier come next week.
Back in the 1950s a top England player would have earned a total of £1,677 in wages, in a year. Fast- forward to 2016, where almost two grand means nothing to players, where they can afford to let it fall out of their pocket, pay day is coming up. Football is changing and it’s changing for the worse.
The average doctor in the UK earns between £75,000- £100,000 a year. Soccer players earn around that in a week without bonuses. Doesn’t really make sense if you ask me. Doctors save us from illnesses. Soccer players save us from boredom. And they don’t always do that.
These players are receiving exorbitant amounts of cash for kicking a ball. Isn’t life so easy for them? Meanwhile the rest of the world almost breaks their back trying to scrape together a few grand before December catches up with them.
And these players don’t notice the rest of the world. In their eyes, they’re the best thing since sliced bread. They’ve been blessed by the powers above to grace their quick feet on the pitch. And as a reward? Money. Lots of it. Much more than necessary, in fact. Are the players going to cut their salary though? They wouldn’t dream of it!
What is even harder to swallow is the fact that players sometimes demand more money. “Sorry boss, but the £90,000 a week won’t do”. So they mean to tell us that they deserve added cash for scoring a few goals? Logic.
These deluded players can afford to sit out a couple of games and still make the same amount of money as they would have if they actually did their job. The sickening thing is, some do. “I feel I’ve got a stomach bug, I don’t think I should play tomorrow. Sure I’ll still get paid.” Take Mr Andy Carroll for instance. He can’t play for 90 minutes without “pulling a muscle.” He’s not the only one. Liverpool’s Daniel Sturridge has missed more games than he has played for them, and there was once a man called Abou Diaby who spent most of his eight years at Arsenal on the treatment table.
Yes, as I type this, West Ham’s Andy Carroll has been ruled out of playing soccer for up to six weeks with a hamstring injury. It won’t bother him in the slightest. Because his piggy bank is getting heavier and heavier, and we can’t do anything about that. I guess that’s just the price of playing soccer.

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Life-long supporter to be honoured

By Michelle Crean There’ll be a very special launch tomorrow afternoon (Sunday) as one club dedicate a new boat to a loyal supporter. Muckross Rowing Club are inviting all members, past and present, friends and supporters to the boathouse for the boat launch at 2.30pm. “We are delighted to honour and name our new Janousek Coxed […]

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By Michelle Crean

There’ll be a very special launch tomorrow afternoon (Sunday) as one club dedicate a new boat to a loyal supporter.

Muckross Rowing Club are inviting all members, past and present, friends and supporters to the boathouse for the boat launch at 2.30pm.

“We are delighted to honour and name our new Janousek Coxed Quad, sponsored by the Cahernane House Hotel, after Kathleen Murphy, a dedicated supporter of our club,” Shona O’Sullivan from the club, who is also Kathleen’s granddaughter, said.

“Kathleen is always supportive of our club fundraisers and has been selling the Muckross Lotto tickets since day one. Every year Kathleen’s enthusiasm and love for the club is especially shown from the shore at Killarney Regatta, as she is all decked out in the yellow of Muckross.”

She added that Kathleen’s family are also very active members of the club and she enjoys listening to their stories from the boathouse and regattas.

“We hope to see you all there to honour and thank Kathleen, a life-long supporter of our club.”

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Killarney man wins most-coveted trophy in sheepdog trials

By Sean Moriarty Kilcummin farmer Tom O’Sullivan – one of the main organisers of last month’s Sheep Dog Trials in Fossa – has become the first Kerry man to win the biggest award in the sport. Tom is the chairman of the Killarney sub-committee and was a member of the 15-strong Irish team that participated […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Kilcummin farmer Tom O’Sullivan – one of the main organisers of last month’s Sheep Dog Trials in Fossa – has become the first Kerry man to win the biggest award in the sport.

Tom is the chairman of the Killarney sub-committee and was a member of the 15-strong Irish team that participated in the international sheepdog competition in Aberystwyth in Wales last weekend.

A total of 60 competitors, 15 each from Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales, contested the biggest event in sheepdog trials on Friday to Sunday last.

After getting through the qualifiers on Friday and Saturday, Tom and his dog Northhill Tess, fended off the challenges of the other top-15 qualifiers to win the International Supreme Champion award.

Not alone is he the first Kerry man to win the competition, which has been running since 1947, he is just the fifth Irishman to do so and the first from Munster.

“The qualifying course was similar to Killarney,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

However, Sunday’s final was much more difficult. His dog had to round up a flock of sheep at the left hand side of the course. Then Northhill Tess, under the guidance of Tom, had to round up a smaller flock and bring them to the same holding pen. When finished, five of the sheep were wearing red collars and Tom had to instruct his dog to separate them and bring them to a separate holding area.

“It is the biggest trophy in sheep dog trailing,” he added. “Everyone who trains a dog does so for this day. It is mind blowing. My family are very proud, they know the time and the work involved preparing for this.”

The standard at the Killarney event last month was evident in Wales last weekend. The Killarney winner, Peter Morgan and his dog Moss, ran Tom to a very close second.

His son Peter Og won the Young Handlers award and Team Ireland were declared the overall winners based on aggregate scores in the final 15.

Tom arrived home to Kilcummin on Monday night to a traditional homecoming bonfire.

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