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Talented Andrew has all the ‘write’ stuff

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Andrew Quinlivan, St Brendan’s College, centre, is awarded third place in the NewsBrands Ireland Press Pass Awards Sports category, pictured with Brian McCrory, president of Irish League of Credit Unions, Claire O’Sullivan, member of the judging panel. Vincent Crowley, chairman, NewsBrands Ireland, and Minister Damien English.

Andrew Quinlivan, St Brendan’s College, centre, is awarded third place in the NewsBrands Ireland Press Pass Awards Sports category, pictured with Brian McCrory, president of Irish League of Credit Unions, Claire O’Sullivan, member of the judging panel. Vincent Crowley, chairman, NewsBrands Ireland, and Minister Damien English.
 


 
THE average Premier League footballer in England earns in a week what a doctor working for the National Health Service there earns in a year. The great Premier League stars can earn double and sometimes treble a doctor’s salary in the same time period. These are just two of the facts that emerge from talented Killarney student Andrew Quinlivan’s critique of the beautiful game.
Andrew, a transition year student from St Brendan’s College, achieved third place in the Sports category of the prestigious Press Pass awards.
Praising his entry, the judges noted: “He tells us that doctors save lives whereas footballers can save us from boredom – and don’t always succeed. Andrew’s work is as cutting as a good striker should be and well worthy of this recognition.”
Andrew received his award from the Minister for Skills, Research and Innovation, Damien English TD, last week at a ceremony in the Convention Centre in Dublin.
Press Pass is a transition-year initiative that focuses on newspapers in education.
“A specially created workbook goes out to all participating schools around Ireland in November each year and then we deliver newspapers free of charge over a two-week period. We had 7,500 students take part this year,” said spokeswoman Anne-Marie Lenihan.
“The students then prepare entries for the journalism competition in four written categories (news, features, opinion and sport) and a photojournalism category. The schools put forward the best three to the national competition which is judged by a panel of journalists and editors from NewsBrands titles, chaired by Professor John Horgan.”
Below you can read Andrew Quinlivan’s prizewinning entry:

THE PRICE OF PLAYING SOCCER

By Andrew Quinlivan

AS I type this, West Ham’s Andy Carroll has been ruled out of playing soccer for up to six weeks with a hamstring injury. And by the end of February, Andy will have earned himself almost half a million pounds for…oh, yeah, not doing his job.
It’s a regular occurrence these days that soccer players are offered lucrative contracts, and it’s also a regular occurrence for them to get injured. While many of these players stay fit and try to dazzle us with their feet, one thing is for certain: their piggy bank will be heavier come next week.
Back in the 1950s a top England player would have earned a total of £1,677 in wages, in a year. Fast- forward to 2016, where almost two grand means nothing to players, where they can afford to let it fall out of their pocket, pay day is coming up. Football is changing and it’s changing for the worse.
The average doctor in the UK earns between £75,000- £100,000 a year. Soccer players earn around that in a week without bonuses. Doesn’t really make sense if you ask me. Doctors save us from illnesses. Soccer players save us from boredom. And they don’t always do that.
These players are receiving exorbitant amounts of cash for kicking a ball. Isn’t life so easy for them? Meanwhile the rest of the world almost breaks their back trying to scrape together a few grand before December catches up with them.
And these players don’t notice the rest of the world. In their eyes, they’re the best thing since sliced bread. They’ve been blessed by the powers above to grace their quick feet on the pitch. And as a reward? Money. Lots of it. Much more than necessary, in fact. Are the players going to cut their salary though? They wouldn’t dream of it!
What is even harder to swallow is the fact that players sometimes demand more money. “Sorry boss, but the £90,000 a week won’t do”. So they mean to tell us that they deserve added cash for scoring a few goals? Logic.
These deluded players can afford to sit out a couple of games and still make the same amount of money as they would have if they actually did their job. The sickening thing is, some do. “I feel I’ve got a stomach bug, I don’t think I should play tomorrow. Sure I’ll still get paid.” Take Mr Andy Carroll for instance. He can’t play for 90 minutes without “pulling a muscle.” He’s not the only one. Liverpool’s Daniel Sturridge has missed more games than he has played for them, and there was once a man called Abou Diaby who spent most of his eight years at Arsenal on the treatment table.
Yes, as I type this, West Ham’s Andy Carroll has been ruled out of playing soccer for up to six weeks with a hamstring injury. It won’t bother him in the slightest. Because his piggy bank is getting heavier and heavier, and we can’t do anything about that. I guess that’s just the price of playing soccer.

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The secret is in the book!

By Michelle Crean  The secret to finding your true happiness is all in a new book which will guide readers to unlock their potential. Brazilian native Michelle Hadad, who moved to Ireland 14 years ago has written ‘The Secret Box: Concave and Convex’, a 432 page book which addresses the issues of suicide and develops into […]

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By Michelle Crean
 

The secret to finding your true happiness is all in a new book which will guide readers to unlock their potential.

Brazilian native Michelle Hadad, who moved to Ireland 14 years ago has written ‘The Secret Box: Concave and Convex’, a 432 page book which addresses the issues of suicide and develops into two different narratives.

It is also a follow up to her previous work ‘The Secret Box…Finding the Key’, a 192 page paperback launched by Michael Healy-Rae TD and reviewed by now retired judge James O’Connor, in October 2017.

Michelle, who studied adult psychology and is a NLP practitioner who encourages clients to transform limiting self-beliefs, explains that this version continues the story of Maria from the first book.

In the first book, the reader compares and contrasts their own life experiences with those of Maria and ask themselves the very question posed at the end of the book in the final chapter or ‘Padlock 13’ – “who are you?”

“Readers are outside the box, they see their own stories – that’s when we judge others,” Michelle told the Killarney Advertiser.

“It is fiction and the story is in two versions, the positive is bigger than the negative. There is always hope regardless of pain.”

She added that people need to forget about what others think, and focus on their own values and traditions.

“It’s a self help book, it doesn’t matter what people think of us, life’s too short. I’m motivating people in a positive way because of my NLP and psychology qualification.”

However, she emphasised that readers don’t have to have read the first book to understand the second one.

“Maria is the leading figure and there’s a few characters from book one but you don’t have to read that to get book two.”

She added that she’s thankful to everyone who helped her along the way.

“I have been blessed to have met so many people to help with my books.”

Both books are available from O’Connor’s Centra, The Reeks and Horans Health Store on Beech Road.

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Green light for teen accommodation

By Michelle Crean  Plans for sheltered accommodation to house homeless teenagers in foster care have been given the go ahead. An Bord Pleanala has approved a three-storey building in Flemings Lane just off High Street, which will have eight bedrooms, two one bedroom apartments and one two bedroom apartment. The teens living within the premises […]

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By Michelle Crean
 

Plans for sheltered accommodation to house homeless teenagers in foster care have been given the go ahead.

An Bord Pleanala has approved a three-storey building in Flemings Lane just off High Street, which will have eight bedrooms, two one bedroom apartments and one two bedroom apartment.

The teens living within the premises will be supervised by applicant Eileen O’Brien who will live on the ground floor of the premises.

The two one-bed apartments on the second floor would either be rented out or used for independent living for the teenagers as they reach adulthood.

The two-bed apartment will be on the third floor. There are also plans for balconies at second and third floor levels.

The proposed apartment building is contemporary in design with a mix of stone and render finish on the lower floors and synthetic burned timber finish on the upper floors. The second floor is recessed at the front and the third floor is recessed at the front and the rear with a decorative feature on the front elevation comprising dark grey timber steel poles. The building will also have a flat roof.

Planning permission was granted subject to 14 conditions including a two-metre high boundary wall to be constructed on south, south-western boundaries of the site and there’s to be no overnight commercial guest accommodation.

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Fans return to Fitzgerald Stadium after eight months

By Sean Moriarty Officials from Fitzgerald Stadium remain hopeful that crowd capacity at the venue can be increased to 500 spectators in time for the Munster final on July 25 – subject to both national health guidelines and Kerry qualifying for the game. Last Saturday evening’s National League semi-final between Kerry and Tyrone was the […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Officials from Fitzgerald Stadium remain hopeful that crowd capacity at the venue can be increased to 500 spectators in time for the Munster final on July 25 – subject to both national health guidelines and Kerry qualifying for the game.

Last Saturday evening’s National League semi-final between Kerry and Tyrone was the first game at the stadium since the 2020 Kerry Petroleum Intermediate Club Football Championship Quarter-Final when Glenbeigh-Glencar played Beaufort on October 4 last year.

Due to current restrictions only 200 fans were allowed attend Saturday’s big match. That will remain in place for Kerry’s opening Munster Championship tie with Clare on June 26.

“It had been more than eight months since Fitzgerald Stadium welcomed back fans to the venue,” stadium PRO Tatyana McGough told the Killarney Advertiser. “Everything went exceptionally well.”

She is hopeful that more restrictions will be eased on July 5, paving the way for an increase in capacity to 500 fans in time for the July 25 Munster Final.

“It is likely that from July 5 up to 500 spectators may be permitted to attend games. We hope this number will increase for the Munster Final. If it is a Cork versus Kerry Munster Final the game will be fixed for Sunday July 25 at 4pm in the Fitzgerald Stadium. The stadium’s staff are very confident in being able to host any number of fans that may be allowed.”

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