Connect with us

News

A tale of two towns – Part Two – Killarney bypass

Published

on

OUT OF DATE: This proposed 2004 route now needs to be redesigned.

 

In the second part of our special investigation into how major projects in Killarney are lagging behind when compared to other towns in Kerry, this week, Sean Moriarty looks at the never ending story of the new bypass.

It seems Killarney has its lilies and Tralee its lovely roads.

We are paraphrasing the words of a famous local song but it is not music to the ears of Killarney’s motorists.

The outer relief road from Lissivigeen to the Tralee Road was originally scheduled for completion in 2009 but due to the economic collapse the work never commenced. It is now back on the Transport Infrastructure Ireland’s (TII) schedule of works but no definite date has been given for commencement. The last we heard, the plans need to be re-designed.

And so it remains on the long finger.

“The entire process had to start all over again at national level and a new list was formulated. A revised and reduced in length bypass was now included. An almost entire new assessment process had to commence and that is on-going. Our fervent hope is that list will remain intact and that the massive expenditure on COVID-19 related projects won't interfere with the road project,” Cllr Michael Gleeson explained to the Killarney Advertiser.

In the meantime work on the Listowel bypass continues. The 5.9km stretch which links the Tarbert and Ballybunnion roads with the Tralee road is well underway.

The Listowel bypass plan was approved by Government in 2005, a date which does not tally with the proposed Killarney bypass which was given governmental approval in 2004.

OTHER PROJECTS CONTINUE

Other major projects are continuing. The Macroom and Ballyvourney bypass is underway. The badly needed Adare bypass got the go-ahead last year, and while construction is yet to start the arrival of the internationally renowned Ryder Cup golf tournament in 2026 will ensure this project will be completed by that time.

Meanwhile, Killarney, the host town of several major annual events, waits.

“On an overview in 2003/4 a specific route corridor with designs finalised and projected completion dates were made public for the major Farranfore to Lissivigeen relief road which was going to alleviate the volumes of traffic coming into Killarney, what happened? Well the bubble and the banks burst and we here in Killarney were forgotten and left behind again,” Mayor Brendan Cronin told the Killarney Advertiser.

[caption id="attachment_33143" align="alignleft" width="278"] OPEN FOR BUSINESS: The Tralee bypass opened in 2013.[/caption]

Last week Kerry County Council approved a plan to collaborate with Limerick County Council to fast track the Abbeyfeale bypass – a direct extension of the Adare project.

“I believe that it was and is very appropriate for KCC to assist Limerick CC in progressing the Abbeyfeale bypass which is of vital importance to Kerry. Cross Border cooperation is essential to many major projects,” Cllr Gleeson added.

Taking this to its extreme, in a few short years, motorists leaving Tralee will be able to travel to the start of Ireland’s motorway network in Limerick (M7 for Dublin and M18 for Galway) on brand new roads that are suitable for today’s volumes of traffic.

Motorists heading to and from the tourist capital of Ireland will have to endure a densely populated and poorly aligned road between Farranfore and Killarney – the scene of at least two fatal accidents this year alone.

FAST-TRACKING

​​​​​​​The fast-tracking of the new bypass is vital and, by default, it will eliminate other traffic blackspots in Killarney that are also on the long-finger.

Congestion between Madam’s Hill and the Cleeney roundabout will be greatly reduced as through-traffic will be diverted away from this stretch of road. The relief road will also go a long way towards reducing traffic on the existing bypass and will help solve issues at the Lewis Road interchange.

The Ballycasheen and Coolcaslagh junctions are two other notorious traffic blackspots - and in the case of the former – an exit from an housing estate leads onto a national primary route.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The situation with four critical junctions at Lewis Road, Madams Hill, Ballycasheen Junction and Coolcaslagh junction is that they are all on the N22 national primary route which is under the total control of Transport Infrastructure Ireland who decide design, planning, layout changes and what level of funding will be spent on any of the above dangerous junctions on the N22. This has proved extremely frustrating over the years because as a Council we are, repeatedly, at every meeting seeking improvements and funding for these junctions but the decisions are made in the TII offices in Dublin,” added Cllr Cronin.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

Katie celebrates 20 years in business

If you enjoy what you do, sure it’s not work at all – and that has been the case for Katie Hickey who has been in business locally for two decades. For the past 20 years Katie has been successfully running Sheer Beauty which is now located at 1 Hogans Lane (Hillary’s Lane). 

 She […]

Published

on

0212752_0212740IMG3976_2.jpg

If you enjoy what you do, sure it’s not work at all – and that has been the case for Katie Hickey who has been in business locally for two decades.

For the past 20 years Katie has been successfully running Sheer Beauty which is now located at 1 Hogans Lane (Hillary’s Lane).



She said that it was a milestone she felt she may not reach on more than one occasion after coming through a pandemic, a recession, a re-location, and three maternity leaves.

However, she said that the loyalty of her clients over the years have given her great encouragement.

“Sincere thanks to my clients past and present who, without doubt, have been the reason I kept going,” Katie said.

Originally located in Fleming’s Lane for 19 years, Katie then re-located her business to Hogan’s Lane in Norma’s Flair for Hair.

“The beauty industry has evolved so drastically over the past 20 years. For me it is keeping things simple and enjoyable. Realising a client’s needs may not be the treatment itself but the time you give to them. Through the years you get to know your clients so well and some beautiful friendships have developed. I hope my clients have gained from me what I have from them. I have so many people I would like to thank and I will personally, but without doubt my husband Andrew and my family, 20 years in business would not have been achieved.

“

She has remained loyal to the brands she has carried over the years including Lycon Waxing, Aviva Tanning, Shellac and Jessica Manicure and Pedicure.

“I was also delighted to bring on board the fabulous facial range that is Killarney Organic. Killarney has been incredibly kind to me. I’m so proud to be part of such a wonderful community. If the past 19 months have proved anything for business it is together we are stronger.”

Attachments

Continue Reading

News

County Board open to GAA museum proposals

By Sean Moriarty The Kerry County GAA Board said it would operate “an open door policy” for any plans to build a GAA museum in the county. There have been talks at a political level to build such a museum in Kerry with political rivals in Killarney and Tralee both pushing for it to be built […]

Published

on

0212683_shutterstock1835613118.jpg

By Sean Moriarty

The Kerry County GAA Board said it would operate “an open door policy” for any plans to build a GAA museum in the county.

There have been talks at a political level to build such a museum in Kerry with political rivals in Killarney and Tralee both pushing for it to be built in their home town.

Before he retired from politics in April, Michael Gleeson was campaigning to build a GAA and cultural museum on the grounds of Fitzgerald Stadium.

His campaign goes back several years before the recession set in, with a €0.5 million bridging loan secured from Croke Park along with funding from Fáilte Ireland. That funding was lost with the onset of the recession before 2010.

Tim Murphy, the outgoing chairman of the Kerry County Board, has confirmed to the Killarney Advertiser that no approaches have been made to the County Board at executive level during his five year stint at the helm.

However, he said the Board would be open to such approaches provided there is sound financial planning behind the project in place.

“The first and most important aspect is the capital funding and my understanding is there needs to be Fáilte Ireland funding in place first,” he told the Killarney Advertiser. “If it gets up and running, there needs to be very clear talks with all stakeholders so everyone knows each others expectations. A museum attracts footfall, but it costs a lot of money to run. We would offer an open door policy to all proposals but funding, first from a capital point of view and then from an operational point of view, will need to be in place.”

Attachments

Continue Reading

LOCAL ADS

Last News

Advertisement

Sport

Trending