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Talented young performers raise the roof

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Fuaimeanna Shliabh Luachra in action in the National Concert Hall.

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EIGHT pals that joined forces through their love of music have been hitting all the right notes of late. Fuaimeanna Shliabh Luachra, which translates as Sounds of Sliabh Luachra, is a group of friends that came together with an interest in traditional music and singing.
The talented performers scooped second prize at the Siansa Gael Linn 2016 final in April, raising the roof of the National Concert Hall on Sunday, April 17. This week, television viewers got to see them in action on TG4 on Monday.
The group was chosen as one of the eight finalists from an initial entry of 50 groups in November last – a fantastic achievement for the musicians as it was their first time to have participated in this prestigious competition
Fuaimeanna Shliabh Luachra is mentored by Mary O’Connor. Four of the group are from Kilcummin (Niamh McSweeney, Aisling O'Connor, Dean Griffin and Steven O'Leary), two of the group are from Fossa (Seán Kelliher and Cian O'Sullivan), and two are from Currow (Eimear Horgan and Thomas Barrett). “It was a very satisfying result for the group who had to combine rehearsals with their study and particularly as three members are due to sit their Leaving Cert in a few weeks’ time,” said Mary. “Tributes must go to their trainers Conor Moriarty who arranged the music, and Roisin Ryan and Cathal Flood who also mentored the group. The group is also grateful for the support of their parents. Well done to Fuaimeanna Shliabh Luachra.”
The unique Siansa combination of competition and performance had kept a 1,000 audience enthralled during the evening while many more listened to the live broadcast on RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta, presented by Áine Hensey. Siansa Gael Linn challenges young musicians to be innovative and creative with traditional music and song, while at the same time appreciating the valuable heritage handed down to them. Another important element is that every aspect of the competition is organised through Irish.
Adjudicating at the final were renowned traditional musicians Dónal O’Connor, Declan Masterson and Killarney native Niamh Ní Charra, who were particularly impressed with the selection of music and song presented by the accomplished musicians and singers of Kilcummin. First prize went to the group ‘Círéib’ from Dublin, with ‘Gluaiseacht’ from West Cork coming in third place.
 


 
Pictured above, Fuaimeanna Shliabh Luachra in action in the National Concert Hall.

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Killarney man to launch second Irish history book

By Sean Moriarty Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2. O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain […]

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By Sean Moriarty

Killarney native Patrick O’Sullivan Greene will launch his second book in the Great Southern Killarney on December 2.

O’Sullivan Greene explains Éamon de Valera’s mission to gain recognition for the newly formed Irish republic in New York in 1919 in his latest book ‘Revolution at the Waldorf: America and the Irish War of Independence’.

Without American recognition and funding the young Irish Government was sure to fail against the might of the British Empire and the book tells the story of how de Valera and Ireland-based Michael Collins – much to the defiance of the British authorities at Dublin Castle – got the new State off the ground.

O’Sullivan grew up in New Street and is now based in Beaufort after a career in finance took him all over the world including Dublin, London, New York and France.

“Killarney is the natural place for me to launch the book,” he told the Killarney Advertiser.

“There will be an interesting mix of people there.”

O’Sullivan Greene published his first book, ‘Crowdfunding the Revolution: The First Dáil Loan and the Battle for Irish Independence’, in 2020.

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Caring group craft charity blankets

By Michelle Crean One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity. Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members […]

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By Michelle Crean

One community group have shown that they care deeply for others by crafting handmade blankets for charity.

Using their range of skills and some colourful wool, members of Kilcummin Community Care worked together to make blankets for service users on the Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus.

“Each blanket is assigned as a personal gift to the clients using the Cancer Link Bus and is kept by them,” Kate Fleming, Chairperson of Kilcummin Community Care, said.

The knitting of the squares to make the blankets began at a gathering in the Rose Hotel in 2018. It was a gathering of different volunteer groups.

The Kerry Cork Cancer Health Link Bus were requesting knitted squares to make blankets for the clients who were using their facilities, she explained.

“Kilcummin Community Care were knitting at the time, so it was decided to help out this worthy cause. We received donations of wool from people in the parish and surrounding areas. Kilcummin ICA also got involved in the efforts.”

During the two years of COVID-19, members of both organisations continued to knit and are still knitting to the present day.

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