Connect with us

News

A kiss under the mistletoe!

Published

on

0217627_shutterstock1521063476.JPG

By Debby Looney, gardening expert

Almost as evocative of Christmas as the Poinsettia is the Christmas cactus, or the Schlumbergera truncata and with its flat, succulent, jointed leaves and colourful flowers, which brings cheer to any room.

These plants are indigenous to the Brazilian rainforest and are actually epiphytic, meaning they live high up in the tree canopy, nestled in the limbs of great trees. They therefore enjoy moisture, and relatively cool temperatures. Buds and flowers will drop off if the plant dries out completely, or if it is over or near a radiator or other heat source.

This is a plant which will survive for generations, there are some over a hundred years old handed down like heirlooms in families!

The trick for getting them to flower at the right time is to have them in a room where they get up to 16 hours of darkness in every 24 hour period, as well as giving them more water with a very small amount of feed added. It is important that there is absolute darkness, not even an occasional switching on of a light. When the buds appear you may move them to a different place. During summer months, keep them out of direct sunlight, as they scorch easily, causing the leaves to redden. Keeping in mind the fact that they are rainforest natives helps when taking care of them!

Mistletoe

Another epiphytic and parasitic tree dweller, equally synonymous with Christmas, is mistletoe. Popular for the tradition of kissing beneath a bunch of it, many gardeners ask me how they might grow their own. We are a romantic bunch! Mistletoe grows on host trees, such as apples, poplar, hawthorn, lime and many others. The berries are sticky and white, favoured by many birds. It is possible to grow it. You will need some fresh berries, preferably picked in March when they are ripe and a tree at least 15-years-old.
Those sold at Christmas are not ripe yet and will not germinate. Any younger and it will suffer due to the parasitic nature of the mistletoe. Simply take a good branch, make a little slice under the bark and insert the berries, maybe three or four together. Wrap with hessian or moss to prevent them falling out, and wait... About one in five should germinate, but the first year you will see nothing as it is only a root and a hypocotyl which grows. The second year you will see a small sprig, and after about five years you will be able to cut some for the house. It is a bit of a wait, but hopefully that kiss will be worth it!

I would like to wish all gardeners and readers of this column a Happy Christmas, and many thanks for all the positive and beautiful comments over the past year!

Continue Reading
Advertisement

News

Man released without charge in murder case

The man in his 50s arrested in connection with the discovery of a body of a woman in her 70s in unexplained circumstances in Ardshanavooley has been released without charge […]

Published

on

0236357_Unknown.jpeg

The man in his 50s arrested in connection with the discovery of a body of a woman in her 70s in unexplained circumstances in Ardshanavooley has been released without charge in relation to this matter.

Miriam Burns was found in her home on Monday afternoon after family and neighbours became concerned about her welfare.

A file is now being prepared for the Director of Public Prosecutions and investigations are ongoing under the direction of a Senior Investigating Officer.

Gardaí are continuing to appeal to any persons who were in the Ardshanavooley area between 5pm on Friday and 1pm on Monday and observed any activity which drew their attention, to come forward.

Any road users who were travelling in the area at these times who may have camera footage (including dash-cam) are asked to make this footage available to Gardaí.

Anyone with information is asked to contact Killarney Garda Station on 064 6671160, the Garda Confidential Line on 1800 666 111, or any Garda Station.

Attachments

Continue Reading

News

Plenty of music and entertainment to celebrate Kilcummin talent

The successes of the Kerry, Munster and All-Ireland Fleadh’s were celebrated with Kilcummin CCÉ members, their families and friends in the clubhouse in Kilcummin on Sunday night. The talent within […]

Published

on

0236155_Unknown_copy.jpg

The successes of the Kerry, Munster and All-Ireland Fleadh’s were celebrated with Kilcummin CCÉ members, their families and friends in the clubhouse in Kilcummin on Sunday night.

The talent within the branch was clearly evident with a packed trophies table. Indeed some of the successes over the last number of months were replayed in a relaxed, jovial atmosphere that meant that all attending had a great night’s entertainment.

“We had demonstrations of winning sets across all age groups and then we moved onto the musicians who pulled out all the stops to entertain the large crowd, packed into the clubhouse,” Derek O’Leary, Kilcummin CCÉ PRO, told the Killarney Advertiser.

John Moriarty, who has recently retired from his role of Supervisor with Kilcummin Rural Development was acknowledged with a presentation to reflect the outstanding work that he has done to enhance and grow Kilcummin Comhaltas over his 25 years in his role, he added.

“Much thanks and praise was also offered to Mary, Adrian and Conor Moriarty, all involved in the progression of dancing and music within the Kilcummin branch. The music and entertainment continued with Helen Kerins and Denis Crowley late into the night. We’re looking forward to next year already!”

Attachments

Continue Reading

LOCAL ADS

Last News

Advertisement

Sport

Trending