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Why is it so hard to lose weight?

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By Angela Kerrisk from Activate Fitness

How many times do you ask yourself why it's so hard to lose weight?

Anyone with a weight loss goal working hard on establishing healthy habits and trying to decrease the frequency of making unhealthy choices knows that losing weight takes time!

By now, you’ve likely heard our nutrition coaching staff say that progress is rarely a straight line and that your weight loss journey is going to take a long term approach to dial things in. This takes much dedication and patience on your part. Paying attention to nutrition and taking the time to learn healthy habits to keep the weight off and be healthy across your lifespan is challenging but rewarding work.

Our nutrition coaches work with clients at various points in their journey. Everyone has their reasons for wanting to improve their nutrition. While losing weight is not a goal for everyone, losing weight and lowering body fat is the most common goal we hear. Many people acknowledge that they need an accountability partner to help lose weight because they encounter all too common roadblocks during their weight loss journey.

Let’s take a look at three of the most common roadblocks to lose weight:

Looking for quick fixes or following fad diets

It is often really tempting to follow a diet that you have heard has worked for someone else, which has led to rapid weight loss. What you don’t know about this is that these quick fixes or fad diets are often super restrictive and are tough to sustain, leading to the regaining of weight. There is no one size fits all approach to weight loss. The benefit of meeting with a nutrition coach is that we work with you to develop an individualised plan that fits your lifestyle. We also teach you to layer healthy habits over time and communicate with you regularly regarding strategies to stay on track with your goals.

Not paying attention to what is going into our beverages

So many times we look at incorporating lots of healthy foods in our diet when we are trying to lose weight, but we forget to pay attention to what we are drinking. Things like sugary coffee beverages, regular soda, and fruit juices are packed with sugar and extra calories that can stand in the way of our weight loss goals.
Our nutrition coaching staff help educate you about these commonly overlooked roadblocks, teach you the importance of logging, and help you learn to read food and beverage labels. These tactics will help you make a more informed decision about these items and see how drinking these beverages affects your goal attainment.

Going all in and making too many changes at once

Weight loss is a marathon and not a sprint. There is a tendency to want to make too many changes all at once in order to meet our goals sooner. What we see is that this is way too overwhelming, and people aren’t investing the time it takes to make healthy habits part of their foundation. You may hear your nutrition coach say that a three-month minimum time commitment is required when entering a nutrition programme. This is not to be mean, but rather help you achieve your goals by genuinely taking the time to learn healthy habits and avoid the temptation to make too many changes all at once.

If you are looking to get some help with overcoming your own roadblocks on your weight loss journey, the nutrition coaching staff are here to help you achieve these goals. Schedule a free consultation www.activate.ie/free-intro and get started on achieving your weight loss goals.

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Photos from Kerry Ladies Football team homecoming at Fitzgerald Stadium on Monday night

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Danny Healy-Ray, Patrick Connor-Scarteen, Minister of education Norma Foley and Francis Flynn pictured at the Kerry Ladies homecoming on Monday. Photo: Tatyana McGough
Kerry Ladies Senior Football managers Declan Quill and Darragh Long pictured with Elaine Kinsella Radio Kerry at the Fitzgerald stadium on Monday. Photo: Tatyana McGogh
Kerry Ladies Homecoming. Photo : Tatyana McGough
Kerry Ladies Homecoming. Photo: Tatyana McGough
Kerry Ladies Homecoming. Photo: Tatyana McGough
Faces in the crowd. Photo: Tatyana McGough
Faces in the Crowd. Photo: Tatyana McGough
Cllr Donal Grady and John Francis Flynn at the Kerry Ladies homecoming. Photo: Tatyana McGough
Kayleigh Cronin (2nd from left) pictured with her teammates at the Kerry Senior Ladies Homecoming at the Fitzgerald Stadium on Monday. Photo: Tatyana McGough
Selina Looney Kerry Ladies Chairperson (front centre) pictured with Kerry players at the Kerry Senior Ladies Homecoming at the Fitzgerald Stadium on Monday. Photo: Tatyana McGough
31 July 2022; Kerry supporters during the TG4 All-Ireland Ladies Football Senior Championship Final match between Kerry and Meath at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo by Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile
31 July 2022; Kerry supporters during the TG4 All-Ireland Ladies Football Senior Championship Final match between Kerry and Meath at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo by Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile
31 July 2022; Kerry supporters during the TG4 All-Ireland Ladies Football Senior Championship Final match between Kerry and Meath at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo by Ramsey Cardy/Sportsfile
Photos from Kerry Ladies Football team homecoming at Fitzgerald Stadium on Monday night
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Keep indoor plants out of full sun

By Debby Looney, gardening expert I was sitting in the dining room looking out at the garden through sheets of rain, when something caught my eye; a dead plant. I […]

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By Debby Looney, gardening expert

I was sitting in the dining room looking out at the garden through sheets of rain, when something caught my eye; a dead plant.

I shifted my focus, looked around me, and observed quite a few plants close to the point of no return! Indoor plants are easy to forget about, especially when the weather is fine. It is hard to believe but several spider plants, an orchid and a Saintpaulia ended up on a certain compost heap this week.

Houseplants do not need a huge amount of care during the summer months, but there are a few things we must not forget! For example, the most obvious is watering. This is the main growing season for houseplants, so watering is essential as is adding some fertiliser. I use specific feeds for my plants, as the balance of nutrients needed can vary hugely depending on the type. As you can imagine, a large, leafy plant will have different requirements to, say, a cactus, or a gerbera. Most plants prefer to dry out slightly between watering, though not as much as I had let them dry out.

Most indoor plants prefer to be out of full sun as they scorch easily. In particular, leafy plants are susceptible to this. Cacti and succulents are ideal for south facing windows during the summer months. Move any leafy plants to a spot away from south facing windows where they can enjoy a more stable temperature and a slightly shaded light.

Often when plants are under stress, both indoors or outdoors, they become prone to disease, a bit like ourselves. For example, plants which dry out frequently are a prime target for whitefly. They often go unnoticed until there is an infestation, at which point you will see woolly cocoon like clusters, as well as clouds of tiny white flies. Blackfly and greenfly are also common pests indoors. The best course of action, after prevention, is to spray the plant at regular intervals with a pesticide. As it is indoors, I would strongly recommend the use of organic spray, or even soapy water. Alternatively, use a pesticide which can be watered onto the soil, such as ‘bugclear ultra’, as this will have a systemic effect.

This time of year is also suitable for repotting your houseplants, if not done in spring, as they will still get a few months of benefit and strong growth. I mix my own compost as I generally have quite a few to repot. I mix four parts good quality compost, one part sharp sand, one part perlite and one part vermiculite by volume. When repotting cacti and succulents I reduce the compost to two parts, and when repotting orchids, I substitute the vermiculite and perlite with two parts fine bark mulch. I never use homemade compost, as I find there are a lot of insects and ‘other creatures’ in it which is fine used outdoors, but I don’t want to invite too much wildlife inside! It is possible to sterilise homemade compost by steaming it, but this is quite an operation, one which I have never undertaken. Alternatively, there are specialist composts available for every type of houseplant. When repotting, use a pot which is about two sizes bigger, unless the plant is a very vigorous one.

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